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by Janice Hartwick Dressel

Author: Janice Hartwick Dressel
Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
Language: English
Publisher: Intl Literacy Assn (January 1, 2003)
Pages: 174 pages
Category: Teaching and Education
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mobi txt docx lit

Start by marking Teaching and Learning about Multicultural Literature .

Start by marking Teaching and Learning about Multicultural Literature: Students Reading Outside Their Culture in a Middle School Classroom as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The study's purpose was to find out what dominant-culture students learn when reading novels about people from cultures different from their own. To determine student learning and whether the teacher had met her instructional goals, the author examined students' written work assigned during the unit.

Multicultural classrooms are now the norm rather than the exception. Teaching Multicultural Students

Multicultural classrooms are now the norm rather than the exception. Learn how teachers can create an inclusive classroom that welcomes all students. Teaching Multicultural Students. Tips, Expert Advice, and Resources for Building Inclusion in the Classroom. Select a Degree Level. The following quiz helps teachers see how well they know their students and their cultural backgrounds.

Teaching and Learning about Multicultural Literature: Students Reading Outside Their .

Teaching and Learning about Multicultural Literature: Students Reading Outside Their Culture in a Middle School Classroom. Janice Hartwick Dressel.

Teaching students from many cultures is no different to teaching in a school with a single culture - with the exception . My wife works in a very middle class/non multicultural school in Hertfordshire and doesn't get the opportunities cropping up as much

Christopher Waugh, secondary English teacher, London Nautical School. I'm a 41 year old English teacher from New Zealand. I've worked as a teacher for 10 years, the most recent three of which in London. My wife works in a very middle class/non multicultural school in Hertfordshire and doesn't get the opportunities cropping up as much. We also have a take part in a global curriculum project about what it means to be a good citizen of the world.

book by Janice Hartwick Dressel. This handbook demonstrates how to provide your middle-school students - especially those from the dominant culture - with a greater understanding and appreciation of literature from other cultures. It is based on a study of one teacher and her eighth-grade classes of 123 dominant-culture readers.

The above listed exercises are great to teach culture, break stereotypes and engage students in a classroom activity.

In English classes today, students are usually asked to read books from British or American authors like The Great Gatsby and The Catcher in the Rye. Beyond doubt are these books masterpieces and well worth reading, but why not include works from other authors as well. The above listed exercises are great to teach culture, break stereotypes and engage students in a classroom activity. In her classes, where focus was on the culture of Kenya, Levy adopted two methods of teaching culture: using explicit and implicit components.

Learning Styles Are Multicultural Too. Each culture is different, and each student is an individual. By approaching multicultural students in a way that is appropriate for their culture, we can better serve their needs. Guidelines for Teaching Latino and African-American Students. Teachers should consider and keep track of the learning styles of all their students. What follows are some general guidelines regarding Latino and African-American students. There will obviously be exceptions and these should not be taken as ironclad rules. Cooperation above competition. Explain the immediate relevance of what is being learned.

International Reading Association, (c)2003. by Middle school success. ISBN: 1600771262 Publication & Distribution: Renton, WA. Topics Entertainment, (c)2007.

Your students’ own culture can be used as a foil for the target culture. The same goes for teaching culture. When your students eat something new and different (that’s maybe even a little weird to them), the fact of cultural diversity will be driven harder into their minds.

In Teaching and Learning About Multicultural Literature: Students Reading Outside Their Culture in a Middle School Classroom, author Janice Hartwick Dressel shares the findings of her study of one teacher, Ann, and Anns eighth-grade classes of 123 readers who participated in a multicultural literature unit. An outstanding feature of this study was that the majority of the students were whitethat is, the dominant cultureand studied novels representing nondominant cultures. The studys purpose was to find out what dominant-culture students learn when reading novels about people from cultures different from their own. To determine student learning and whether Ann had met her instructional goals, the author examined students written work assigned during the unit. Samples of these writing assignments presented in the book include

a Book Club Organizer in which students kept notes and information about characters, setting, and theme; a Dialogue Journal in which students wrote to one another about their novels; and a Pre- and Post-Unit Survey in which students answered questions about their reading and about their novels.

In addition to presenting the outcomes of the study and sharing what the students writing revealed, Dressel also reviews the findings of other researchers in similar studies, discusses the teachers role in students learning and reading of multicultural literature, and makes suggestions for what teachers can do in their own classrooms to help students integrate personal response and social responsibility.

Although the readers discussed in the book are primarily white, the viewpoints and recommendations shared have more to do with differences in power than with differences in color. Because differences in power exist among people of all ages, genders, and ethnicities, the findings will interest readers regardless of their students backgrounds. Teaching and Learning About Multicultural Literature will help teachers and students, particularly students from a dominant culture, read multicultural literature with greater understanding.