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by R. Geivett

Author: R. Geivett
Subcategory: Religious Studies
Language: English
Publisher: Temple University Press; First Edition edition (November 29, 1993)
Pages: 276 pages
Category: Spirituality
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lit lrf lit mbr

This book is an appraisal of Hick's Many have thought that the reality of evil in the world makes the existence of God .

This book is an appraisal of Hick's Many have thought that the reality of evil in the world makes the existence of God unlikely and religious belief irrational. The most influential contemporary solution to this problem has been offered by philosopher John Hick: God is responsible for evil, using it as a soul-builder to make human beings into morally perfect creatures. This book is an appraisal of Hick's work on the specific topic of theodicy - his effort to cope philosophically with the problem of evil from within the Judeo-Christian tradition.

Evil & the Evidence For . .has been added to your Cart

Evil & the Evidence For .has been added to your Cart. Moving from a comparison of the Irenaean and Augustinian traditions in theodicy to a powerfully original critique of Hick's influential 'soul-making' theodicy, Geivett presents a richly developed natural theology drawing on contemporary scientific opinion in support of an ex nihilo creation. This work is notable for its exceptionally thorough documentation and references, making it a valuable sourcebook for reflection on God and evil.

In the elaboration of his soul-making theodicy, John Hick agrees with a controversial point made by compatibilists Antony Flew and John Mackie against the free will defense. Namely, Hick grants that God could have created humans such that they would be free to sin but would, in fact, never do so. In this paper, I identify three previously unrecognized problems that arise from his initial concession to, and ultimate rejection of, compatibilism ) two important texts, Hick rejects compatibilism for different and seemingly contradictory reasons

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Skip to the audio challenge. Evil and the Evidence for God: The Challenge of John Hick's Theodicy, with an Afterword by Hick John. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1993.

GOD: CHALLENGE OF JOHN HICKS THEODICY By R. Geivett VG+. The Philosophy & Study of EVIL 100 Books in pdf on CD Theodicy.

EVIL AND EVIDENCE FOR GOD: CHALLENGE OF JOHN HICKS THEODICY By R. John Hick's Theodicy: A Process Humanist Critique by Nimrod Tal (English) Paperb.

John Hick's book, "Evil and the Love of God", is perhaps the best known work to redress this difficulty in modern .

John Hick's book, "Evil and the Love of God", is perhaps the best known work to redress this difficulty in modern terms. Sharing Hick's interest in responding to the question of evil, R. Douglas Geivett constructs his own new "theodicy for today. But Geivett departs from Hick by embracing the Augustinian tradition of free will and returning the responsibility for evil to human beings themselves. R. Douglas Geivett is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Biola University in La Mirada, California. Format Hardback 288 pages.

book by R. Douglas Geivett

book by R. Douglas Geivett. How to reconcile the existence of evil with the belief in a benevolent God has long posed a philosophical problem to the system of Christian theism.

Geivett has contributed chapters to God Matters: Readings in the Philosophy of Religion; God Under Fire; The Rationality of Theism; and Does God . Evil and the Evidence for God: The Challenge of John Hick's Theodicy. Temple University Press, 1993

Geivett has contributed chapters to God Matters: Readings in the Philosophy of Religion; God Under Fire; The Rationality of Theism; and Does God Exist? The Craig-Flew Debate. Geivett is the former president of the Evangelical Philosophical Society. Temple University Press, 1993.

The Evil God Challenge is a thought experiment. The challenge is to explain why an all-good god should be more likely than an all-evil god. Those who advance this challenge assert that, unless there is a satisfactory answer to the challenge, there is no reason to accept God is good or can provide moral guidance. Papers by Stephen Cahn, Peter Millican, Edward Stein Christopher New, and Charles B Daniels, explored the notion of an 'anti-God'-an omnipotent, omniscient God who is all evil

Many have thought that the reality of evil in the world makes the existence of God unlikely and religious belief irrational. The most influential contemporary solution to this problem has been offered by philosopher John Hick: God is responsible for evil, using it as a soul-builder to make human beings into morally perfect creatures. This book is an appraisal of Hick's work on the specific topic of theodicy - his effort to cope philosophically with the problem of evil from within the Judeo-Christian tradition. R. Douglas Geivett seeks to show why any adequate response to the problem of evil must begin with the positive reasons one might have for believing in God.Geivett begins with a survey of three influential figures who grappled with this question: St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Gottfried Leibniz. Hick's approach to the problem of evil is then contrasted with their views. The author makes a case for the possibility of natural theology and he defends the view that it is rational to believe in the existence of God, even given the reality of evil in the world. Geivett takes issue with Hick's approach to the significance of evil, the nature of human freedom, and the character of the afterlife. He argues for a return to the Augustinian free-will tradition: that creatures with free wills are responsible for evil.This discussion of one of the most challenging questions in the philosophy of religion concludes with an afterword by John Hick in which he responds to the author's thesis.