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by Elijah Judah Schochet

Author: Elijah Judah Schochet
Subcategory: Judaism
Language: English
Publisher: Jason Aronson, Inc. (July 1, 1993)
Pages: 257 pages
Category: Spirituality
Rating: 4.5
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Although hasidic Jews are today associated with mainstream Orthodoxy, Hasidism, during the year of its genesis

Although hasidic Jews are today associated with mainstream Orthodoxy, Hasidism, during the year of its genesis. This book seeks to answer the question: why were the Gaon of Vilna and other rabbinic leaders so hostile to the early Hasidim? To be sure, the rabbinic establishment may have been misinformed, or may have learned about isolated instances of aberrant behavior by Hasidim. But there were real differences between the Hasidim and their opponents (commonly known as the Mitnagdim, or "opponents").

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Elijah ben Solomon Zalman, known as the Vilna Gaon or Elijah of Vilna, or by his Hebrew acronym HaGra ("HaGaon Rabbenu Eliyahu") or Elijah Ben Solomon (Sialiec, April 23, 1720 – Vilnius October 9, 1797), was a Talmudist, halakhist, kabbalis.

Elijah ben Solomon Zalman, known as the Vilna Gaon or Elijah of Vilna, or by his Hebrew acronym HaGra ("HaGaon Rabbenu Eliyahu") or Elijah Ben Solomon (Sialiec, April 23, 1720 – Vilnius October 9, 1797), was a Talmudist, halakhist, kabbalist, and the foremost leader of misnagdic (non-hasidic) Jewry of the past few centuries. He is commonly referred to in Hebrew as ha-Gaon he-Chasid mi-Vilna, "the pious genius from Vilnius".

In The Hasidic Movement and the Gaon of Vilna, Elijah Judah Schochet analyzes the conflict centering on the hasidic movement in the eighteenth century and the role played Although hasidic Jews are today associated with mainstream Orthodoxy, Hasidism, during the year of it. .

In The Hasidic Movement and the Gaon of Vilna, Elijah Judah Schochet analyzes the conflict centering on the hasidic movement in the eighteenth century and the role played Although hasidic Jews are today associated with mainstream Orthodoxy, Hasidism, during the year of its genesis, was bitterly opposed and indicted with bans of excommunication by the Jewish establishment

Rabbi Elijah, known as the Gaon of Vilna, who was the outstanding rabbinic scholar of his time, emerged from his cloistered existence to confront and battle these seemingly ostensible threats from within the hasidic movement.

Rabbi Elijah, known as the Gaon of Vilna, who was the outstanding rabbinic scholar of his time, emerged from his cloistered existence to confront and battle these seemingly ostensible threats from within the hasidic movement. However, there is no record of his having personally encountered hasidic Jews.

Schochet, Elijah Judah. Place of Publication. This book may take up to two business days to be retrieved from storage. Northvale, New Jersey, London. AR 1084 012. View more books, in related categories: Jewish History Figures in Judaism Jewish Mysticism, Hasidism & Kabbalah East European Jewry Biographies & Autobiographies.

Coauthors & Alternates.

Saul Lieberman: The Man and His Work. by Elijah J. Schochet, Solomon Spiro. ISBN 9780873341110 (978-0-87334-111-0) Softcover, JTS Press, 2005. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. Elijah J. Schochet at LibraryThing.

The Vilna Gaon was so strongly opposed to the Hassidic movement that .

The Vilna Gaon was so strongly opposed to the Hassidic movement that he and others like him came to be called misnagdim, which means "those who are against. In 1772, the misnagdim excommunicated the hassidim, but the ban did not stick. 1) The hassidic movement and the Gaon of Vilna by Elijah Schochet (Aronson publishing). Hasidic Rebbes and their disciples may espouse heretical views, and engage in evil acts such as the Neturei Karta (Hassidic sect which consorts with the Arab enemies of the Jews in the name of religion) without facing effective censure from rabbinical bodies since each Hassidic sect is an independent body within Judaism.

See The Hasidic Movement and the Gaon of Vilna by Elijah Judah Schochet. For a full treatment of this subject see The Great Maggid by Jacob Immanuel Schochet, 3rd ed. 1990, ch. X, ISBN 0-8266-0414-5. An Encounter with the Alter Rebbe - Program One Hundred Sixty Eight - Living Torah. Rescued from the Reich.

Elijah Judah Schochet The Hasidic Movement and the Gaon of Vilna (New Jersey, London, 1994), pp. 92-93. a bushel full of veracity and profundity in the following exposition by Rabbi Elijah, the Gaon of Vilna. 56 : Ḥakirah, the Flatbush Journal of Jewish Law and Thought. 3. The Rebbe/Tzaddik: A Cosmic Facilitator. At first glance, the general analogy of Torah to rain appears to be clear and appropriate; just as rain sustains life so does the Torah sustain Jewish life, and without it there would be no Jewish survival.

Although hasidic Jews are today associated with mainstream Orthodoxy, Hasidism, during the year of its genesis, was bitterly opposed and indicted with bans of excommunication by the Jewish establishment. In The Hasidic Movement and the Gaon of Vilna, Elijah Judah Schochet analyzes the conflict centering on the hasidic movement in the eighteenth century and the role played by the leader of the opposition, Rabbi Elijah, the Gaon of Vilna. The reasons Hasidism was challenged are of value not only vis-a-vis historical curiosity but in terms of the nature of traditional Judaism, its religious priorities, and the perceived dangers inherent in the hasidic style of rabbinic leadership. Tzaddikim were singularly authorized to descend into sin's domain to emancipate the sinner in cases of vice and iniquity, and these actions were viewed by the mitnagdim, or opponents, as "a dangerous flirtation with the notion of 'sin.'" Schochet embarks on a fascinating foray into the misconceptions held by the opponents of the hasidim that fueled the tension between the two. Rabbi Elijah, known as the Gaon of Vilna, who was the outstanding rabbinic scholar of his time, emerged from his cloistered existence to confront and battle these seemingly ostensible threats from within the hasidic movement. However, there is no record of his having personally encountered hasidic Jews. Why, then, was he so disturbed by Hasidism? What threats did he perceive the movement posed? Did the excommunication of the hasidim by the Gaon of Vilna really occur? In The Hasidic Movement and the Gaon of Vilna, Schochet attempts to unravel the mystery underlying Rabbi Elijah and his campaign against the hasidic movement. Some aspects ofthe controversy between Hasidism and the mitnagdim still linger today, and Rabbi Schochet's effort to explicate the eighteenth-century dilemma and its contenders allows the reader a more privileged glance at past tensions as well as an understanding of the players in today's drama