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Download Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE-400 CE djvu

by Martin S. Jaffee

Author: Martin S. Jaffee
Subcategory: Judaism
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 19, 2001)
Pages: 356 pages
Category: Spirituality
Rating: 4.7
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The classical Rabbinic tradition (legal, discursive, and exegetical) claims to be Oral Torah, transmitted by word of mouth in an unbroken chain deriving its authority ultimately from diving revelation to Moses at Sinai. Since the third century .

The classical Rabbinic tradition (legal, discursive, and exegetical) claims to be Oral Torah, transmitted by word of mouth in an unbroken chain deriving its authority ultimately from diving revelation to Moses at Sinai. however, this tradition has been embodied in written texts. Through judicious deployment and analysis of the evidence, Martin Jaffee is able to show that the Rabbinic tradition, as we have it, developed through a mutual interpretation of oral and written modes.

Oral traditions formed the basis for culture through the ancient Greco-Roman world. Jaffee shows that the written texts of rabbinic tradition was widespread. The halakhic teachings of the sage or rabbi continued on in the knowledge and practice of his students

Oral traditions formed the basis for culture through the ancient Greco-Roman world. Rote memorization was standard practice of education across the ancient world, and, in fact, it formed the basis for all education-much more than literacy. The halakhic teachings of the sage or rabbi continued on in the knowledge and practice of his students study was not merely to master knowledge discursively. Rather, it was to be transformed by what one possessed (p 147).

Torah in the Mouth Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism 200 BCE 400 CE. Tammy Maynard.

The book argues that the rabbinic ideology of Oral Torah – Torah in the Mouth – is, in great measure, a. .

The book argues that the rabbinic ideology of Oral Torah – Torah in the Mouth – is, in great measure, a legitimation of the institution of rabbinic discipleship, which depended upon the primacy of facetoface relationships, unmediated by the written word. This book is a study of the relationship of oral tradition to written sources among different Jewish groups that thrived in Palestine from the later Second Temple period into Late Antiquity. Its main concern is to track the emerging awareness, within diverse Palestinian scribal groups, of the distinction between written books and the oral traditions upon which they were based or in light of which they were interpreted.

Torah in the Mouth is Jaffee's initial monograph on the subject, in which he builds extensively and impressively on his prior work, augmenting it in breadth, depth, and theoretical sophistication. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal.

Part I deals with the role of oral tradition in Second Temple scribalism, looking first at the social settings in which scribal orality functioned (Ch. 1), then in turn at patterns of performative reading and text interpretation among two Jewish groups from the Second Temple period, the Qumran sectaries (Ch. 2) and the Pharisees (Ch.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral. We will not question the reason of returns, as condition is always open to interpretation. We do not always include previous owner's names in books. Publisher: Oxford University Press, Oxford. Publication Date: 2001. Shipping Terms: Extra shipping may be needed for sets and heavy volumes. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

15 See Martin S. Jaffee, The Oral-Culture Context of the Talmud Yerushalmi: Greco-Roman Rhetorical Paideia . 18 As Y. Elman argues, the prohibition of recording rabbinic legal tradition in writing was observed far more carefully in Babylonia than in Palestine. Jaffee, The Oral-Culture Context of the Talmud Yerushalmi: Greco-Roman Rhetorical Paideia, Discipleship, and the Concept of Oral Torah, in Transmitting Jewish Traditions: Orality, Textuality, and Cultural Diffusion, ed. Yaakov Elman and I. Gershoni (New Haven Conn. Yale University Press, 2000), 27–73. Moreover, it has been noted that the Yerushalmi’s citation of antecedents, as baraitot, is much looser than the Bavli’s.

Martin S. Jaffee, Torah in the Mouth: Writing and Oral Tradition in Palestinian Judaism, 200 . New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. Steven D. Fraade, Yale University. Fraade, "Martin S. 400 .," The Journal of Religion 84, no. 1 (January 2004): 145-146. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Apostle Paul in Arabia. Stephen's Defense before the Sanhedrin.

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The classical Rabbinic tradition (legal, discursive, and exegetical) claims to be Oral Torah, transmitted by word of mouth in an unbroken chain deriving its authority ultimately from diving revelation to Moses at Sinai. Since the third century C.E., however, this tradition has been embodied in written texts. Through judicious deployment and analysis of the evidence, Martin Jaffee is able to show that the Rabbinic tradition, as we have it, developed through a mutual interpretation of oral and written modes.