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by Gary K Waite

Author: Gary K Waite
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language: English
Publisher: Red Globe Press; 2003 edition (September 6, 2003)
Pages: 284 pages
Category: Reference
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit txt docx rtf

Gary K. Waite examines in-depth how church leaders dispelled rising religious doubt by persecuting heretics, and how alleged infernal . Waite's explanation of the Jewish situation in Early Modern Europe also has many problems.

Gary K. Waite examines in-depth how church leaders dispelled rising religious doubt by persecuting heretics, and how alleged infernal plots, and witches who confessed to making a pact with the Devil, helped the authorities to reaffirm orthodoxy. Waite argues that it was only when the authorities came to terms with pluralism that there was a corresponding decline in witch panics. were officially tolerated in the Christian west because they proved an extremely useful, if unwitting, ally in the campaign to expel religious doubt from the hearts of Christian believers" (19).

Bibliographic Details. Bringing together the fields of Reformation and witchcraft studies, this fascinating book reveals how the early modern period's religious conflicts led to widespread confusion and uncertainty

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Red Globe Press. Bringing together the fields of Reformation and witchcraft studies, this fascinating book reveals how the early modern period's religious conflicts led to widespread confusion and uncertainty. Gary K.

Series Title: European Culture and Society. Fear of the Devil and his followers inspired horrific incidents of judicially-approved terror in early modern Europe, leading after 1560 to the infamous witch hunts. Author: Gary K Waite. Street Date: May 29, 2003.

European Culture and Society Series). Bringing together the fields of Reformation and witchcraft studies, Gary K. Waite reveals how the early-modern period's religious conflicts led to widespread confusion and uncertainty, against which alleged diabolical conspiracies served to reaffirm orthodoxy.

European Culture and Society Acknowledgements Introduction The Devil, Magic and Heresy in the Later Middle Ages The Reformation and the End of the World Heresy, Doubt an. .

European Culture and Society. Acknowledgements Introduction The Devil, Magic and Heresy in the Later Middle Ages The Reformation and the End of the World Heresy, Doubt and Demonising the 'Other' The Reformation, Magic and Witchcraft 1520-1600 Religious Conflict and the Rise of Witch Hunting 1562-1630 Religious Pluralism and the End of the Witch Hunts Conclusions Notes Annotated Bibliography Index.

Bringing together the fields of Reformation and witchcraft studies, Gary K. Waite reveals how the early-modern period's religious conflicts led to widespread confusion and uncertainty, against which alleged disbolical conspiracies served to reaffirm orthodoxy. As with the vicious persecution of Anabaptists, witch hunting was a means of restoring belief in the veracity of official teachings about the supernatural realm.

Manufacturer: Palgrave Macmillan Release date: 6 September 2003 ISBN-10 : 0333754344 ISBN-13: 9780333754344.

With this book, Professor Gary Waite has written one of the clearest overviews of witchcraft and heresy in Europe during .

With this book, Professor Gary Waite has written one of the clearest overviews of witchcraft and heresy in Europe during the 15th through 17th centuries. The book is broken into six main chapters ranging from concepts of the devil, magic and heresy in the Later Middle Ages to how the Reformation transformed Europe and challenged orthodox beliefs to how these new conflicts arising among Catholics and Protestants promoted intolerant views of the other, which ultimately led to the witch craze.

Bringing together the fields of Reformation and witchcraft studies, Gary K. Waite reveals how the early-modern period's religious conflicts led to widespread confusion and uncertainty, against which alleged diabolical conspiracies served to reaffirm orthodoxy. As with the vicious persecution of Anabaptists, witch-hunting was a means of restoring belief in the veracity of official teachings about the supernatural realm. Waite argues that it was only when the authorities came to terms with religious pluralism that there was a corresponding decline in witch panics.