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Download The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century djvu

Download The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century djvu

by Gerald J. Baldasty

Author: Gerald J. Baldasty
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language: English
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Pr (November 1, 1992)
Pages: 256 pages
Category: Reference
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi lrf docx azw

This book spans the history of newspapers from 1801 to 1899 with a focus on how the business model changed. Baldasty makes the argument in his book that news in the latter half of the 19th century had become a business.

This book spans the history of newspapers from 1801 to 1899 with a focus on how the business model changed. It is separated into six chapters which divides the 19th century into two periods: partisan and non-partisan. The first two chapters look at those two periods, while the latter four chapters look at aspects of commercialization from advertising, newspapers as a business, and selling the news. Though we like to think of journalism as something higher than that, a business is what it is.

Gerald J. Baldasty argues that broad changes in American society, the national economy, and the newspaper industry brought about this dramatic shift

Gerald J. Baldasty argues that broad changes in American society, the national economy, and the newspaper industry brought about this dramatic shift. Increasingly in the nineteenth century, news became a commodity valued more for its profitablility than for its role in informing or persuading the public on political issues. Newspapers started out as highly partisan adjuncts of political parties. As advertisers replaced political parties as the chief financial support of the press, they influenced newspapers in directing their content toward consumers, especially women.

Baldasty, Gerald J. Publication date.

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Download books for free. Gerald J. Baldasty argues that broad changes in American society, the national economy and the newspaper industry brought about this dramatic shift. Increasingly in the 19th century, news became a commodity valued more for its profitability than for its role in informing or persuading the public on political issues. The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century. By Gerald J. Baldasty. Baldasty is an American educator, journalist and writer. Baldasty is the author of such books as The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century (1992) and Vigilante Newspapers: A Tale of Sex, Religion, and Murder in the Northwest (Washington, 2005). He is Professor Emeritus, and the University of Washington Provost and Executive Vice President Emeritus.

Full Title:The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century. ISBN-13:978-0299134044. Baldasty makes use of nineteenth-century from throughout the era, manuscript letters from journalists and politicians, journalism and advertising trade publications, government reports-to document the changing role of the press during the period.

by Gerald J. Published in Madison, Wis 19th century. There's no description for this book yet.

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Tables, charts, appendixes, notes, bibliography, and index.

"The Commercialization of News in the Nineteenth Century" traces the major transformation of newspapers from a politically based press to a commercially based press in the 19th century. Gerald J. Baldasty argues that broad changes in American society, the national economy and the newspaper industry brought about this dramatic shift. Increasingly in the 19th century, news became a commodity valued more for its profitability than for its role in informing or persuading the public on political issues. Newspapers started out as highly partisan adjuncts of political parties. As advertisers replaced political parties as the chief financial support of the press, they influenced newspapers in directing their content toward consumers, especially women. The results were recipes, fiction, contests and features on everything from sports to fashion alongside more standard news about politics. Baldasty makes use of 19th century materials - newspapers from throughout the era, manuscript letters from journalists and politicians, journalism and advertising trade publications, government reports - to document the changing role of the press during the period. He identifies three important phases: the partisan newpapers of the Jacksonian era (1825-1835), the transition of the press in the middle of the century, and the influence of commercialisation of the news in the last two decades of the century.