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by Michael Biggins,Janet Crayne

Author: Michael Biggins,Janet Crayne
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (June 21, 2001)
Pages: 252 pages
Category: Reference
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi azw rtf lrf

This book offers a distinctive and desirable perspective on the seven successor states, their cultures, politics and . An investigation of recent developments and trends within the Yugoslav successor states since the signing of the Dayton Agreements in Autumn 1995.

This book offers a distinctive and desirable perspective on the seven successor states, their cultures, politics and identities by providing an internal. This book offers a distinctive and desirable perspective on the seven successor states, their cultures, politics and identities by providing an internal perspective on the region and its developments. Show all. About the authors.

in Yugoslavia's various republics Finally, as Yugoslavia's old communist paradigm of information management gradually lost control, the market gave rise to numerous tabloid weeklies and dailies that banked o. .

Finally, as Yugoslavia's old communist paradigm of information management gradually lost control, the market gave rise to numerous tabloid weeklies and dailies that banked on nationalism and fear, serving as handmaidens to media-savvy demagogues and helping to rekindle past rivalries.

Start by marking Publishing in Yugoslavia's Successor States as Want to Read .

Start by marking Publishing in Yugoslavia's Successor States as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Publishing in Yugoslavia's Successor States. by Michael Biggins, Janet Crayne. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780789010452 (978-0-7890-1045-2) Hardcover, Routledge, 2001. Find signed collectible books: 'Publishing in Yugoslavia's Successor States'. Learn More at LibraryThing. Janet Crayne at LibraryThing.

Publishing in Serbia". In Biggins, Michael; Crayne, Janet (ed. Publishing in Yugoslavia's Successor States. New York City: The Haworth Press. p. 90. ISBN 978-0-78901-046-9. php?title Jovan Mandil&oldid 936889789". Categories: 1873 births.

Publishing in Yugoslavia's Succesor States" has been co-published simultaneously as Slavic & East European Information Resources, Vo., Num. 2/3 2000.

Автор: Biggins, Michael Crayne, Janet Название: Publishing in Yugoslavia& Successor States ISBN .

An appendix section covers the period from 1927 through to 1936. A detailed bibliography and table of rulers are also included.

Acquisitions from Yugoslavia's successor states. Collecting books and journal from the various regions of what once was Yugoslavia in the past few years has posed numerous challenges. Some difficulties have their parallel in the book trade of othe. More).

132 Suzzallo Library, Box 352900 University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. edu Telephone: (206) 543-5588. In collaboration with Janet Crayne, U. of Michigan, and author of: "Publishing in Slovenia in the 1990s, in Slavic and East European Information Resources, vol. 1 (1999/2000), no. 2/3: p. 2-38. Tomaž Šalamun," in South Slavic Writers Since World War II. Detroit : Gale Press, 1997 (Dictionary of Literary Biography ; vol. 181): p. 288-294.

From the Editor's Foreword: “Without any doubt, the 1990s will long be remembered as the decade of Yugoslavia's prolonged disintegration. A virtual blueprint of the conflict is accessible to anyone in a position to track the independent print media that were then emerging in Yugoslavia's various republics.”Publishing in Yugoslavia's Successor States presents the results of extensive tracking and research in that area. You'll learn how weekly independent news magazines such as Mladina in Slovenia, Danas in Croatia, and, later, Vreme in Serbia courageously documented the centrifugal political forces at work in Yugoslavia at the time. Independent daily newspapers, often located in provincial cities away form the centers of political control, pursued similar policies, adhering to high standards of objective political coverage. The periodical press also weighed in over time with more reflective assessments of the area's evolving political crisis and recommendations for managing it. Finally, as Yugoslavia's old communist paradigm of information management gradually lost control, the market gave rise to numerous tabloid weeklies and dailies that banked on nationalism and fear, serving as handmaidens to media-savvy demagogues and helping to rekindle past rivalries. Publishing in Yugoslavia's Successor States will take you on a turbulent tour of this vital industry struggling to survive and thrive in a war-torn land.