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by Thomas A. Bass

Author: Thomas A. Bass
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Soho Pr Inc; 1st edition (April 1, 1996)
Pages: 278 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf lrf lit mbr

In his new book Vietnamerica, the American journalist Thomas Bass has written a moving story of the . Thomas Bass-Dante to Pham Xuan An’s Virgil-guides us through the hellish wars that shaped modern Vietnam.

In his new book Vietnamerica, the American journalist Thomas Bass has written a moving story of the Amerasians and their battle for identity against indifferent bureaucracies here and abroad. Vietnamerica is also a book about the erosion of memory and resolve, the intractable traditions that made these children strangers at home, and the pain of their (too-infrequent) encounters with their fathers in America, a country dealing with its own racial intolerance.

Vietnamerica: the war comes home. Left behind when South Vietnam fell in 1975, the children of Vietnamese women and American servicemen remain a deeply disturbing symbol of the racism rooted within both traditions.

Bass, Thomas A. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The book may frustrate some readers who expect a story about heroes and villains which comes to a happy ending. Citation: Michael L. Krenn. There is little of that here. The Amerasians are neither saints nor demons. Bass recounts their sad and brutal tales, and then tells us that "many of the stories in this book may be untrue. The pain behind them, on the other hand, is real" (p. 145). The people running the AHA and the Resource Center are never really portrayed as sadistic brutes or as angels of compassion.

The Vietnamese called the Amerasian children of . Start by marking Vietnamerica: The War Comes Home as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.  .

For other people named Thomas Bass, see Thomas Bass (disambiguation). Vietnamerica: The War Comes Home (Soho, 1996, 1997). The Predictors (Holt, Viking-Penguin, 1999)

For other people named Thomas Bass, see Thomas Bass (disambiguation). This book focuses on African viewpoints to the African situation. The Predictors (Holt, Viking-Penguin, 1999). The Spy Who Loved Us (Public Affairs, 2009).

VIETNAMERICA The War Comes Home. However, the book leaves one with a haunting awareness that the United States has not done right by the offspring of a war the country lost and is still trying to forget. Not until 1987, 12 years after the fall of South Vietnam, did Congress pass a law allowing Vietnamese children who could prove American parentage to come here. We are continually improving the quality of our text archives.

Having visited Amerasian Park, I thought of the book and the many other Amerasians that are still in other parts of Vietnam and have been trying to leave.

Select Format: Hardcover. Having visited Amerasian Park, I thought of the book and the many other Amerasians that are still in other parts of Vietnam and have been trying to leave. This year's top sellers.

VIETNAMERICA The War Comes Home By Thomas A. Bass Soho. Brown was born in 1959. His father was an American adviser; his mother abandoned him to a Danang orphanage. When the Marines landed in 1965, he ran away and went to live with them; they gave him a toy Snoopy dog and his name. He spent his childhood as a mascot, being passed from one .

The Vietnamese called the Amerasian children of U.S. servicemen bui doi, "the dust of life." Half American and half Asian, they had been abandoned by their fathers to a xenophobic society that ostracized them. Nor was the U.S. government anxious to acknowledge their paternity and assume responsibility. With the passage of the Homecoming Act, however, the Congress finally, after many years, opened the door to their immigration. Any child who could demonstrate American parentage - if only by the simple evidence of Western features - would be welcome. Relatives too. By then the children's average age was 19.The federal authorities settled the Amerasians in cities like Rochester and Utica, provided them with temporary housing in dilapidated asylums and meager vocational training in jobs like motel housekeeping. Ironically, a good many began their new lives accompanied by bogus relatives who had alleged kinship in order to escape their homeland, using the Amerasians like human tickets to America for their own families and themselves.Reunions with fathers were rare. The majority of young adults after a very few months were on their own again. Little had changed for them except that in America they were illiterate in two languages and knew virtually no one. The transition was not easy for any but if the Amerasian children are anything they are survivors, however damaged.