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Download African American Theater Buildings: An Illustrated Historical Directory, 1900-1955 djvu

Download African American Theater Buildings: An Illustrated Historical Directory, 1900-1955 djvu

by Eric Ledell Smith

Author: Eric Ledell Smith
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: McFarland Publishing (November 1, 2003)
Pages: 278 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit lrf docx doc

African American Theater Buildings book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

African American Theater Buildings book. African American theater buildings were theaters owned. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

African American theater buildings were theaters owned or managed by blacks or whites for an African American audience. Such theaters were nickelodeons, vaudeville houses, musical houses and neighborhood movie theaters.

Find nearly any book by Eric Ledell Smith. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. African Americans of Harrisburg (PA) (Black America).

Eric Ledell Smith, American historian. University Michigan, 1980-1990. Curator junior education Detroit (Michigan) History Museum, 1990-1992. Curator African American Museum, Philadelphia, 1992-1993. Historian Pennsylvania State Archives, Harrisburg, 1993-2001, State Museum Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, since 2001.

Bessie Smith sings at the Apollo Theater in 1934. Angela Y. Davis publishes Blues with her book titled BLUES LEGACIES AND BLACK FEMINISM Gertrude ''Ma'' Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday.

Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe record "Bumble Bee". Bessie Smith sings at the Apollo Theater in 1934. Bessie Smith dies after car accident. US Post Office issues a Sister Rosetta Stamp.

African American Theatre: An Historical and Critical Analysis (Cambridge Studies in. .David Krasner is Director of Undergraduate Theater Studies at Yale University, where he teaches theater history, acting, and directing

African American Theatre: An Historical and Critical Analysis (Cambridge Studies in American Theatre and Drama). David Krasner is Director of Undergraduate Theater Studies at Yale University, where he teaches theater history, acting, and directing. His book,Resistance, Parody, and Double Consciousness in African-American Theatre 1895-1910, won the Errol Hill award from ASTR.

Staging faith religion and African American theater from the Harlem renaissance to World War II, by: Prentiss, Craig R. Published: (2013). A Sourcebook of African-American performance plays, people, movements, Published: (1999)

Staging faith religion and African American theater from the Harlem renaissance to World War II, by: Prentiss, Craig R. A Sourcebook of African-American performance plays, people, movements, Published: (1999). American theater of the 1960s by: Szilassy, Zoltán, 1947- Published: (1986). Mickery Theater an imperfect archaeology, by: Pearson, Mike, 1949- Published: (2011).

African American theater buildings. by Eric Ledell Smith. Published 2003 by McFarland in Jefferson, . Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-252) and index.

From 1900 to 1911, the theater was known as Keith & Proctor’s Harlem Opera House. Smith, Eric Ledell (24 October 2003). ISBN 978-0-7864-4922-4. Through the early 1920s, the venue was included in the Keith-Albee vaudeville circuit. By 1922, it was purchased by Frank Schiffman and subsequently closed. The Harlem Opera House showed films starting in the mid-1930s.

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African American theater buildings were theaters owned or managed by blacks or whites for an African American audience. Such theaters included nickelodeons, vaudeville houses, musical houses and neighborhood movie theaters. Although nearly 2,000 African American theater buildings existed in the 20th century, very little has been written about them.

In this book the African American theater buildings from 1900 through 1955 are arranged by state, then by city, and then alphabetically under the name by which they were known. The street address, dates of operation, number of seats, architect, whether it was a member of TOBA (Theater Owners Booking Association), type of theater (nickelodeon, vaudeville, musical, drama or picture), alternate name(s), race and name of manager or owner, whether the audience was mixed, and the fate of the theater are provided where known. Commentary by theater historians is also provided.