» » The Man from Scottsboro: Clarence Norris and the Infamous 1931 Alabama Rape Trial, in His Own Words (Clarence Norris and the Infamous 1931 Alabama Rape, in His O)
Download The Man from Scottsboro: Clarence Norris and the Infamous 1931 Alabama Rape Trial, in His Own Words (Clarence Norris and the Infamous 1931 Alabama Rape, in His O) djvu

Download The Man from Scottsboro: Clarence Norris and the Infamous 1931 Alabama Rape Trial, in His Own Words (Clarence Norris and the Infamous 1931 Alabama Rape, in His O) djvu

by Kwando Mbiassi Kinshasa

Author: Kwando Mbiassi Kinshasa
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: McFarland & Company (December 2, 2002)
Pages: 239 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: azw doc mbr rtf

In March 1931, Clarence Norris, a self-described hobo, and eight other black men were arrested in Paint Rock, Alabama. In this previously unpublished, electrifying interview, Norris also outlines his philosophy for surviving the Scottsboro ordeal as well as more contemporary racial ordeals.

In March 1931, Clarence Norris, a self-described hobo, and eight other black men were arrested in Paint Rock, Alabama.

The Man from Scottsboro book. Though he was later pardoned, Norris spent 13 years in jail.

Though later pardoned, Norris spent 13 years in jail.

Kwando Mbiassi Kinshasa. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

At the Scottsboro, Alabama Courthouse in April 1931, nine young black men .

Eight received a death sentence; the youngest boy life in prison. The NAACP and Communist Party (CP) vied to represent the Scottsboro Boys, but the CP prevailed. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1997.

jsp ?id h-1456, Kinshasa, K. & Norris, C. (1997).

'A man should never give up hope,'' Mr. Norris said after receiving his pardon. 'I'm just so glad to be free.

He was then a fugitive for 30 years after he violated his parole and fled Alabama. He came to New York City, where he worked as a warehouseman. Mr. Norris and the other youths were caught on the same train, but in different cars, with two white women, who said they had been raped. 'A man should never give up hope,'' Mr.

Kinshasa, Kwando Mbiassi. Norris, Clarence, and Sybil Washington. The Last of the Scottsboro Boys: An Autobiography. New York: Putnam, 1979. They were immediately found guilty, and all but one was sentenced to execution.

Kinshasa, . Jefferson, NC: McFarland. Klarman, M. J. (2009). Cite this chapter as: Martin . 2014) Been There Done That. In: Fasching-Varner . eds) Trayvon Martin, Race, and American Justice. Teaching Race and Ethnicity. SensePublishers, Rotterdam.

In March 1931, Clarence Norris, a self-described hobo, and eight other black men were arrested in Paint Rock, Alabama, and charged with raping two white girls who were also hoboes on the train he was riding. The one day trial of the nine men, better known as the "Scottsboro Boys" resulted in conviction and the death sentence despite a paucity of evidence. Though later pardoned, Norris spent 13 years in jail. (He died in 1989.) Clarence Norris's description of his arrest, trial and sentencing is both tragic and inspirational. His letters to his family, attorneys and supporters show his spirit as he struggled against a biased judicial system. A lengthy 1980 interview with Norris is supplemented by contemporary newspaper accounts of the trial, articles by Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter and Alabama Appeals Court Judge James E. Horton, and legal opinions of the defendants' attorney, Samuel S. Leibowitz.