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by Edward H. Spicer

Author: Edward H. Spicer
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: University of Arizona Press (November 1, 1977)
Pages: 300 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw txt docx lrf

Edward H. Spicer 1966: 991). Provinse seems to have seen something in the young Spicer and encouraged him to go on for a PhD. Ned later wrote, John Provins. rged me to go to the University of Chicago.

Edward H. Spicer's informative Introduction sets the stage for comparing "popular" and "scientific" medicine. Graduates of medical schools have been taught that their body of knowledge is the one true medical tradition

Edward H. Graduates of medical schools have been taught that their body of knowledge is the one true medical tradition. The world has many medicines and thousands of practitioners who do not believe that "Western" medicine is a universal cure-all. These practitioners may be as certain that what they practice is the one true medical tradition," says Spicer

Medicine & Ethnic Superstition in the Southwest. Published by Thriftbooks.

Medicine & Ethnic Superstition in the Southwest. com User, 12 years ago. From the cover: This book explores traditions guiding the medical arts of Yaqui, Anglo, Black and Mexican American Communities and points out the relationship between alternative and scientific medicine. Beliefs prevail that illness may be punishment for sin, or caused by witchcraft or overwork. Treatment may include dreams, herbs, massage, or prayer. These practitioners may be as certain that what they practice is the one true medical tradition," says Spicer. These practitioners may be as certain that what they practice is the one true medical tradition," says Spicer

Bauwens, Eleanor Eustice, 1931-; Spicer, Edward Holland, 1906-.

Bauwens, Eleanor Eustice, 1931-; Spicer, Edward Holland, 1906-. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station24. cebu on July 25, 2019.

Spicer, Edward H. (e. 1977 Ethnic Medicine in the Southwest. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. Stewart, Horace 1971 Kindling of hope in the disadvantaged: a study of the Afro-American healer. Mental Hygiene 55: 96–100. Tinling, David C. 1967 Voodoo, root work, and medicine. Psychosomatic Medicine 29: 483–490. Webb, Julie Yvonne 1971 Louisiana Voodoo and superstitions related to health. These practitioners may be as certain that what they practice is the one true medical tradition," says Spicer

Ethnic Medicine in the Southwest. Tucson, The University of Arizona Press, 1977, 291 p. Brunel, G. (1979).

Ethnic Medicine in the Southwest. Tucson, The University of Arizona Press, 1977, 291 . .An article from journal Anthropologie et Sociétés (Communication, Afrique de l’Est, enfants, travail féminin), on Érudit. Brunel, Gilles "Edward H. SPICER (é. : Ethnic Medicine in the Southwest.

The mission of the Edward H. and Rosamond B. Spicer Foundation is to honor and further the legacy and life works of Edward H. and . Publications: Cycles of Conquest, Yaquis a Cultural History, Ethnic Medicine in the Southwest, Human Problems in Technological Change. and Rosamond Spicer in the fields of anthropology, community development and, social justice. This page is intended to inform the anthropological community and those who care about social justice and the human condition. Community organisation.

Plant medicine is a billion-dollar business: health food stores, small yerberias, and . Ethnic Medicine in the Southwest.

Plant medicine is a billion-dollar business: health food stores, small yerberias, and even giant grocery store chains carry hundreds of medicinal herbs. By one estimate, up to one-third of the . population uses alternative medicine-generally in addition to conventional therapy and commonly without telling their doctors. This book is a thorough cataloguing of how plants were and still are used in medicine by Native American and Mexican culture. The author obtained her information by interviews with patients and pouring through endless articles on the subject.

Octavo, , PP.291, Explores Traditions Guideing The Medical Arts Of Yaqui, Anglo, Black And Mexican American Communities