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by Verene Shepherd

Author: Verene Shepherd
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Ian Randle Publishers,Jamaica; First Edition edition (October 10, 2011)
Pages: 982 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf docx mbr azw

Verene A. Shepherd is Professor of Social History and Director of the Institute for Gender and Development Studies at the University of the West Indies. Paperback: 982 pages.

In Engendering Caribbean History. Verene A.

Engendering Caribbean History book. Verene Albertha Shepherd (née Lazarus; born 1951) is a Jamaican academic who is a professor of social history at the University of the West Indies in Mona

Engendering Caribbean History book. Verene Albertha Shepherd (née Lazarus; born 1951) is a Jamaican academic who is a professor of social history at the University of the West Indies in Mona. She is the director of the university's Institute for Gender and Development Studies, and specialises in Jamaican social history and diaspora studies. Books by Verene A. Shepherd.

Verene Shepherd, Bridget Brereton. The contributions chart the development of an intellectual tradition which has moved Caribbean women away from the margins of feminist discourse.

Verene Albertha Shepherd (née Lazarus; born 1951) is a Jamaican academic who is a professor of social history at the University of the West Indies in Mona. Shepherd was born in Hopewell, Saint Mary Parish, one of the ten children of Ruthlyn and Alfred Lazarus

Engendering History broadens the base of empirical knowledge on Caribbean women's history . The book is pan-Caribbean in its approach, though most articles.

Engendering History broadens the base of empirical knowledge on Caribbean women's history and re-evaluates the body of work that exists.

Engendering Caribbean History: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Keynote Address Professor Verene Shepherd (University of the West Indies and the Caricom Reparations Commission), ‘Past Imperfect, Future Perfect (?): Reparation, Rehabilitation and Reconciliation’. Livestock, Sugar & Slavery: Contested Terrain in Colonial Jamaica. Working Slavery, Pricing Freedom: Perspectives from the Caribbean, Africa and the African Diaspora. Slavery without Sugar. I Want to Disturb My Neighbour: Lectures on Slavery, Emancipation and Post-Colonial Jamaica. A scholar activist, Prof. John McIntyre (Prestonfield).

2011: Verene A. Shepherd (e., Engendering Caribbean History: Cross-cultural Perspectives (Kingston: Ian Randle). 2. 2007: Verene A. Shepherd, I Want to Disturb My Neighbour : Lectures on Slavery, Emancipation & Postcolonial Jamaica. Kingston: Ian Randle). 3. 2006: Verene Shepherd/Hilary Beckles, Freedoms Won: Caribbean Emancipations, Ethnicities, and Nationhood. Cambridge UP). 4. 2004: Beckles/Shepherd, Liberties Lost: Caribbean Indigenous Societies and Slave Systems (Cambridge UP); 5. 2002: Verene A. Shepherd, Maharani’s Misery (Kingston: UWI Press).

Apart from the works of Verene Shepherd's Maharani's Misery: Narratives of a. .The book is divided into two sections and each is further subdivided into.

Apart from the works of Verene Shepherd's Maharani's Misery: Narratives of a Passage from India to the Caribbean (2002), and Ron Ramdin's The Other Middle Passage: Journal of a Voyage from Calcutta to Trinidad 1858 (1994), the literature on Indian sea voyage experience is very limited. It is within this context that The First Crossing contributes significantly to the knowledge of Caribbean Indian indentured experience. The book is divided into two sections and each is further subdivided into smaller ones.

Delivering the lecture will be Professor Verene Shepherd, University Director of the Institute for Gender & Development Studies and Professor of Social History at the Mona Campus of The University of the West Indies. Professor Shepherd’s lecture Education, Social Justice and Advocacy: The UWI to the World while paying tribute to the honouree, will also zero in on Mrs Charles’ interest in History, Heritage and Advocacy and illustrate how, as a newly positioned activist University, The UWI has been responding to regional and international discourses and needs.

There is now a significant body of research on Caribbean Women s History. In Engendering Caribbean History, Verene A. Shepherd builds on her previous collaborative work with colleagues Bridget Brereton and Barbara Bailey and presents a completely revised and expanded version of Engendering History (1995), which became a required text in colleges and universities in the Caribbean, North America and the UK. This comprehensive new volume has 10 sections comprising 54 articles from leading scholars in the fields of Women s History and Gender Studies. Interdisciplinary and pan-Caribbean, this Reader focuses on key debates in history, sociology and politics in its survey of the critical discourses relating to conquest, the treatment of indigenous women, slavery, emancipation and the post-emancipation period. Engendering Caribbean History begins with an introduction to the diverse approaches used by historians to explore the history of women in the Caribbean. It is followed by a theoretical discussion on the construction of women s history representative of the multiple experiences of women in Africa, Britain and the Caribbean. The stereotypical misrepresentation of enslaved and mixed race women by outsiders is then discussed before delving into the period of African enslavement and the transition from slavery to freedom. Issues of gender, migration and identity as well as the study of women, politics and the law are covered in the subsequent sections. The Reader is rounded out by a discussion of the variety of sources and methodological approaches to the study of Caribbean women s history before concluding with a return to the male marginalization debate. Comprehensive and wide-ranging, Engendering Caribbean History is a valuable contribution to the ongoing intellectual tradition moving Caribbean women s experience away from the periphery and towards the mainstream of historical discourse.