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by Christopher Noxon

Author: Christopher Noxon
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Crown (June 20, 2006)
Pages: 288 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr docx lrf lrf

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With Rejuvenile, Christopher Noxon brilliantly charts the continual turning of the Boomers, X’ers and Y’ers away . We seriously need more playful times, and Rejuvenile will help us get there.

With Rejuvenile, Christopher Noxon brilliantly charts the continual turning of the Boomers, X’ers and Y’ers away from the brittle authority of work-obsessed adulthood. Pat Kane, author of The Play Ethic: A Manifesto for a Different Way of Living. Christopher Noxon has the same affection for the ingenuous adults he describes as they do for their Ninja Turtles, skateboards, and Lego blocks.

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Christopher Noxon has coined a word for this new breed of grown-up: rejuveniles. And as a self-confessed rejuvenile, he’s a sympathetic yet critical guide to this bright and shiny world of people who see growing up as winding down -exchanging a life of playful flexibility for anxious days tending lawns and mutual funds. In Rejuvenile, Noxon explores the historical roots of today’s rejuveniles (hint: all roads lead to Peter Pan), the toyification of practical devices (car cuteness is at an all-time high), and the new gospel of play.

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Additional Product Features. Trade Paperback (Us),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound. Country of Publication. The World, Ideas, Culture": General Interest.

Author: Christopher Noxon. Once upon a time, boys and girls grew up and set aside childish things. Title: Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grownup. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book. Nowadays, moms and dads skateboard alongside their kids and download the latest pop-­song ringtones.

Rejuvenile : Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up. In Rejuvenile, Christopher Noxon identifies a profound change in what it means to be an adult in the 21st century. by Christopher Noxon. Noxon offers up the hope that some of us, at least, will be able to create a new model of maturity: more functional, and definitely more fun. " 0. Report.

Written by. Christopher Noxon. Manufacturer: Crown Release date: 20 June 2006 ISBN-10 : 1400080886 ISBN-13: 9781400080885.

Grown up kickball leagues, mommies skateboarding groups, doll and toy collectors as well as Disney World .

Grown up kickball leagues, mommies skateboarding groups, doll and toy collectors as well as Disney World aficionados are all profiled. References listed in back. Cons: I found Noxon's profiles, interviews, and presentation of the rejuvenile culture more interesting than his analysis of it. Grade: B+ ( ). charlierb3 Jul 27, 2007.

Once upon a time, boys and girls grew up and set aside childish things. Captains of industry pose. Roots of the rejuvenile - The rejuvenile at play - The lure of the toy - Uncle Walt and the adult playground - Boomerangers, twixters, and panic over grown-up kids - Playalong parents and the proudly childfree - The rejuvenile grown up. Responsibility: Christopher Noxon. Abstract: Once upon a time, boys and girls grew up and set aside childish things.

Once upon a time, boys and girls grew up and set aside childish things. Nowadays, moms and dads skateboard alongside their kids and download the latest pop-song ringtones. Captains of industry pose for the cover of BusinessWeek holding Super Soakers. The average age of video game players is twenty-nine and rising. Top chefs develop recipes for Easy-Bake Ovens. Disney World is the world’s top adult vacation destination (that’s adults without kids). And young people delay marriage and childbirth longer than ever in part to keep family obligations from interfering with their fun fun fun.Christopher Noxon has coined a word for this new breed of grown-up: rejuveniles. And as a self-confessed rejuvenile, he’s a sympathetic yet critical guide to this bright and shiny world of people who see growing up as “winding down”—exchanging a life of playful flexibility for anxious days tending lawns and mutual funds. In Rejuvenile, Noxon explores the historical roots of today’s rejuveniles (hint: all roads lead to Peter Pan), the “toyification” of practical devices (car cuteness is at an all-time high), and the new gospel of play. He talks to parents who love cartoons more than their children do, twenty-somethings who live happily with their parents, and grown-ups who evangelize on behalf of all-ages tag and Legos. And he takes on the “Harrumphing Codgers,” who see the rejuvenile as a threat to the social order. Noxon tempers stories of his and others’ rejuvenile tendencies with cautionary notes about “lost souls whose taste for childish things is creepy at best.” (Exhibit A: Michael Jackson.) On balance, though, he sees rejuveniles as optimists and capital-R Romantics, people driven by a desire “to hold on to the part of ourselves that feels the most genuinely human. We believe in play, in make believe, in learning, in naps. And in a time of deep uncertainty, we trust that this deeper, more adaptable part of ourselves is our best tool of survival.” Fresh and delightfully contrarian, Rejuvenile makes hilarious sense of this seismic culture change. It’s essential reading not only for grown-ups who refuse to “act their age,” but for those who wish they would just grow up.