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by Brice Obermeyer

Author: Brice Obermeyer
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (December 1, 2009)
Pages: 340 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.7
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Brice Obermeyer details the Delawares’ struggle for self-determination, revealing important .

Brice Obermeyer details the Delawares’ struggle for self-determination, revealing important insights into the process and politics of federal recognition. This perceptive ethnography of a tribe trying to assert its right to sovereignty and its independence from a larger and more powerful tribe complicates accepted notions of how the federal recognition process works and the effects it has on tribal members and tribal relations. Although many tribes exist today as constituent parts of a larger American Indian tribe, Delaware Tribe in a Cherokee Nation is the first book to study this phenomenon.

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The Delaware Tribe of Oklahoma is an American Indian tribe currently incorporated as part of the larger Cherokee Nation. Originally from the Hudson and Delaware River valleys, the Delawares are neither socially nor historically related to the Cherokees and were incorporated with them simply because they were forced to move to the Cherokee Nation in 1867.

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Delaware Tribe in a Cherokee Nationis an ethnographic study of the Delaware Tribe and its struggle for federal recognition and political separation from the larger Cherokee Nation. Brice Obermeyer details the Delawares' struggle for self-determination, revealing important insights into the process and politics of federal recognition. This perceptive ethnography of a tribe trying to assert its right to sovereignty and its independence from a larger and more powerful tribe complicates accepted notions of how the federal recognition process works and the effects it has on tribal members and. Brice Obermeyer details the Delawares’ struggle for self-determination, revealing important insights into the process and politics of federal recognition.

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Knapke said in an interview at the museum, One of our goals is appreciation for what the Native Americans sacrificed here on the grounds, what a great victory they had here because of the strategies they used"

Knapke said in an interview at the museum, One of our goals is appreciation for what the Native Americans sacrificed here on the grounds, what a great victory they had here because of the strategies they used". While the remains of the soldiers under the commands of St. Clair and Wayne during the two battles lie beneath the 101-foot-tall monument in Fort Recovery, the skull and bones of a Native American remained in a display case at the town museum until the 1980s.

Keywords: Delaware, leadership, Lincoln, ISBN, literary, poems, Gunn, Obermeyer, Brice, Cherokee.

The Delaware Tribe of Oklahoma is an American Indian tribe currently incorporated as part of the larger Cherokee .

The Delaware Tribe of Oklahoma is an American Indian tribe currently incorporated as part of the larger Cherokee Nation. Originally from the Hudson and Delaware River valleys, the Delawares are neither socially nor historically related to the Cherokees and were incorporated with them simply because they were forced to move to the Cherokee Nation in 1867. The Delawares never assimilated into Cherokee society and culture and today seek federal recognition as a separate tribe to protect their particular cultural and political identity. However, Delaware efforts to achieve federal recognition are complicated by the Cherokee Nation, which does not support Delaware independence as it could potentially compromise Cherokee jurisdiction. Delaware Tribe in a Cherokee Nation is an ethnographic study of the Delaware Tribe and its struggle for federal recognition and political separation from the larger Cherokee Nation. Brice Obermeyer details the Delawares’ struggle for self-determination, revealing important insights into the process and politics of federal recognition. This perceptive ethnography of a tribe trying to assert its right to sovereignty and its independence from a larger and more powerful tribe complicates accepted notions of how the federal recognition process works and the effects it has on tribal members and tribal relations. Although many tribes exist today as constituent parts of a larger American Indian tribe, Delaware Tribe in a Cherokee Nation is the first book to study this phenomenon in Native North America.