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by George L. Mosse

Author: George L. Mosse
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Indiana Univ Pr; 1st edition (June 1, 1985)
Pages: 112 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr azw docx mobi

German Jews beyond Judaism. května 1997 This brilliant exploration will be of interest to scholars of modern Jewish history, African-American studies, American Jewish.

German Jews beyond Judaism. ISD LLC. Koupit jako dárek. Mosse traces how Jewish artists, writers, and thinkers actively sought to participate in German culture and communicate these ideals through popular culture, scholarship, and political activity. This brilliant exploration will be of interest to scholars of modern Jewish history, African-American studies, American Jewish history, . history, and minority studies.

German Jews beyond Judaism book. German Jews felt a powerful urge to integrate, to find their Jewish substance in German culture and craft an identity as both Germans and Jews. Jews were emancipated at a time when high culture was becoming.

His book German Jews Beyond Judaism (1985) describes how the German-Jewish dedication to Bildung, or cultivation . In Political Symbolism in Modern Europe: Essays in Honor of George L. Mosse, pp. 1–15. Seymour Drescher et a. eds.

His book German Jews Beyond Judaism (1985) describes how the German-Jewish dedication to Bildung, or cultivation, helped Jews to transcend their group identity. But it also argues that during the Weimar Republic, Bildung contributed to a blindness toward the illiberal political realities that later engulfed Jewish families. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 1982. GLM: An Appreciation. 275–284.

German Jews beyond Judaism Paperback – May 1, 1997. The Transformation of German Jewry, 1780-1840 (Studies in Jewish History). by. George L. Mosse (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Mosse (1918-1999) was an American cultural historian and taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Jews and Non-Jews in Eastern Europe 1918-1945.

Jews were emancipated at a time when high culture was becoming an integral part of German citizenship. Jews and Non-Jews in Eastern Europe 1918-1945. The German-Jewish Dialogue Reconsidered: A Symposium in Honor of George L. Mosse (German Life and Civilization). Mosse, Klaus Berghahn. The Holy Pretence: A Study in Christianity and Reason of State from William Perkins to John Winthrop. Howard Fertig, George L. Mosse.

Turning to modern German history in 1964, Mosse .

Turning to modern German history in 1964, Mosse challenged conventional interpretations of Nazism and fascism in a series of innovative books including "The Crisis of German Ideology: Intellectual Origins of the Third Reich" (1964), "Nazi Culture" (1966), "The Nationalization of the Masses: Political Symbolism and Mass Movements in Germany from the Napoleonic Wars Through the Third Reich" (1975). His most personal book, "German Jews Beyond Judaism" (1985), describes the German-Jewish dedication to "Bildung", or cultivation, as helping to transcend a narrow group identity.

Jewish Identity German Culture Weimar Republic Optimistic Belief . Mosse, ‘Gerschom Scholem as a German Jew’, Modern Judaism 10 (1990), pp. 117–33. See especially pp. 124–5. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Jewish Identity German Culture Weimar Republic Optimistic Belief Restorative Messianism. These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. The quote appears on p. 39. oogle Scholar.

The Jewish Response to German Culture: From the Enlightenment to the Second World War. Jehuda Reinharz, Walter Schatzberg. German Jews beyond Judaism. Germans and Jews since the Holocaust: The Changing Situation in West Germany. Anson Rabinbach, Jack Zipes. Published by: Hebrew Union College Press. Book Description: Jews were emancipated at a time when high culture was becoming an integral part of German citizenship.

Home Browse Books Book details, The German-Jewish Dialogue . German Jews Beyond Judaism the e L. Mosse Case 233. Notes 247. {{text}}.

Home Browse Books Book details, The German-Jewish Dialogue Reconsidered: . . By Klaus L. Berghahn. After the Germans under Hitler had first excluded the German Jews from cultural life, then expelled them from their soil, and finally exterminated them, there could be no more talk of a German-Jewish dialogue.

Based on the author's Efroymson lectures at Hebrew Union College. Jews were emancipated at a time when high culture was becoming an integral part of German citizenship. German Jews felt a powerful urge to integrate, to find their Jewish substance in German culture and craft an identity as both Germans and Jews. George Mosse argues that they did this by adopting the concept of Bildung_the idea of intellectual and moral self-cultivation_and combining it with key Enlightenment ideas such as optimism about human potential, individualism and autonomy, and a connection between knowledge and morality through aesthetics. Personal friendships could be devoted to common pursuit of Bildung and become a means of overcoming differences, becoming a means for integration into German society. Mosse traces how Jewish artists, writers, and thinkers actively sought to participate in German culture and communicate these ideals through popular culture, scholarship, and political activity. From the historical biographies, novels, and short stories of Stefan Zweig and Emil Ludwig; to the psychoanalysis of Freud, which sought to subject irrationality to reason; to the revolutionary thought of Walter Benjamin_Jews sought to influence a mass political culture that was fast drifting into irrationality. As individualism was subsumed into nationalism, and eventually the German political right's racist version of nationalism, German-Jewish dialogue became more difficult. Jews remained idealistic as German society became less rational, their ideas corresponded less and less to the realities of German life, and they drifted out of the mainstream into an intellectual isolation. Yet out of this German-Jewish dialogue, what had once been part of German culture became a central Jewish heritage.