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by Sidney Weintraub

Author: Sidney Weintraub
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Univ of Pittsburgh Pr (December 1, 2000)
Pages: 256 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mobi lrf lrf azw

Items related to Financial Decision-Making in Mexico: To Bet a Nation. His principal thesis is clear and authoritative, and the book is written in a clear and readable style.

Items related to Financial Decision-Making in Mexico: To Bet a Nation. Weintraub, Sidney Financial Decision-Making in Mexico: To Bet a Nation (Pitt Latin American Series). ISBN 13: 9780822957317. Sidney Weintraub is the William Simon Chair in Political Economy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington . a position he has held for the past five years. He is the author of more than 20 books and 200 articles, many dealing with Mexican political and economic issues, and Mexico-U.

Weintraub, Sidney, 1922-2014. Note: Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, c2000. Subject: Financial crises - Mexico. Subject: Monetary policy - Mexico. Subject: Finance - Mexico. Subject: Mexico - Economic conditions - 1994-. Subject: Mexico - Economic policy - 1994

Xx, 212 pages ; 23 cm. "The book examines why able economic managers in Mexico, on the basis of contemporaneous information in their possession, made the decisions they did, and with such disastrous consequences

Xx, 212 pages ; 23 cm. "The book examines why able economic managers in Mexico, on the basis of contemporaneous information in their possession, made the decisions they did, and with such disastrous consequences. The major conclusion is that decision-making was heavily influenced by the cultural milieu in Mexico, which involved secrecy of key data and unwillingness to entertain dissenting opinions, whether from Mexicans or outsiders. Includes bibliographical references (pages 194-202) and index.

Weintraub, a leading scholar of Mexico, again produces a great book dealing with the dependent-dominant relationship of Mexico and . His purpose is to introduce more balance into the relationship, and one hopes that Americans and Mexicans read this book and contribute to that goal.

Weintraub, a leading scholar of Mexico, again produces a great book dealing with the dependent-dominant relationship of Mexico and the US and the policy initiatives of both countries.

Financial Decision-Making in Mexico book. Financial Decision-Making in Mexico: To Bet a Nation. Pitt Latin American Studies). Weintraub provides an analysis of the economic and political events taking place in Mexico, the decisions made to deal with these events, and the reactions of international financial actors outside Mexico, thusoffering the first integrated analysis of the Mexican market crash.

Latin American Politics and Society. Salinas deGortari, Carlos. México: un paso dificil a la modernidad. Barcelona: Plaza Janes. Recommend this journal

Latin American Politics and Society. Recommend this journal. Latin American Politics and Society.

Mexico's economic meltdown of 19941995 has been described as the first financial crisis of the because of the speed with which the repercussions-the tequila effect-spanned the globe. During the first five years of his six-year term, Carlos Salinas was one of the most admired of Mexican presidents, both at home and internationally.

Financial Decision-Making in Mexico: To Bet a Nation. Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh.

In The Siamese Coup Affair, Barber becomes involved in a political assassination and coup d'état. State Department, Weintraub became the Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Finance and Development from 1969 to 1974. Sidney Weintraub was married to Gladys Katz Weintraub from 11 August 1946 until her death in 2001.

Sidney Weintraub, American economist, educator. Recipient Distinguished Career Service award Agency for International Development, 1975, Aguila Azteca, Mexico, 2006. Served with United States Army, 1943-1946. Member of American Economic Association, American Foreign Service Association, Council on Foreign Relations, Cosmos (Washington).

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press. Date: November 9, 2000.

Mexico's economic meltdown of 19941995 has been described as the first financial crisis of the twenty-first-century because of the speed with which the repercussions--the tequila effect--spanned the globe. During the first five years of his six-year term, Carlos Salinas was one of the most admired of Mexican presidents, both at home and internationally. Today he is Mexico's "favorite villain," as he has called himself, because the economy collapsed three weeks after he left office on December 1, 1994. The Mexican peso crisis was then a unique event that drastically shifted thinking about the workings of the international financial system. The lessons learned have since been amplified by the abrupt East Asian economic collapse in 1997.

Financial Decision-Making in Mexico examines why able economic managers in Mexico, based on the contemporaneous information in their possession, made the decisions they did, with such disastrous consequences. Weintraub's conclusion is that decision-making was heavily influenced by the cultural milieu in Mexico, which involved secrecy of key data and unwillingness to entertain dissenting opinions whether from Mexicans or outsiders.

The speed with which hot money (portfolio capital) moved out of Mexico once confidence was lost has changed global thinking about how to deal with a growing world problem. The dire consequence of hot money movement has revealed itself both in Asia and in Brazil, and will undoubtedly recur elsewhere. Weintraub provides an analysis of the economic and political events taking place in Mexico, the decisions made to deal with these events, and the reactions of international financial actors outside of Mexico, thus providing the first integrated analysis of the Mexican market crash.