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Download Cheating Welfare: Public Assistance and the Criminalization of Poverty djvu

by Kaaryn S. Gustafson

Author: Kaaryn S. Gustafson
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press (July 23, 2012)
Pages: 238 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc lrf docx azw

Home Browse Books Book details, Cheating Welfare: Public Assistance and the. Changes in public attitudes and government practices have led to what can be described as the criminalization of poverty

Home Browse Books Book details, Cheating Welfare: Public Assistance and the. Cheating Welfare: Public Assistance and the Criminalization of Poverty. By Kaaryn S. Gustafson. Changes in public attitudes and government practices have led to what can be described as the criminalization of poverty. The term criminalization is used in this book to describe a web of state practices and policies related to welfare. There are several different strands of criminalization. First, there are a number of practices involving the stigmatization, surveillance, and regulation of the poor.

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Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Introduction Reconstructing social ills : from the perils of poverty to welfare dependency The criminalization of poverty A glimpse at the interviewees Living within and without the rules Engaging with rules and negotiating compliance Contextualizing criminality, non-compliance, and resistance Cheating ourselves. Rubrics: Welfare fraud United States Public welfare California Case studies. Download now Cheating welfare : public assistance and the criminalization of poverty Kaaryn S.

Assistance to the poor has never been provided without strings attached.

In reality, some recipients manipulate the welfare system for their own ends, others are gravely hurt by punitive policies, and still others fall somewhere in between. In Cheating Welfare, Kaaryn S. Gustafson endeavors to clear up these gray areas by providing insights into the history, social construction, and lived experience of welfare. Assistance to the poor has never been provided without strings attached. Aid to the poor, particularly aid to the poor, has been designed to regulate-markets and the economy, families, morality, even motherhood. That is not to say that providing for the poor has been divorced from a public desire to do good for the poor.

Cheating Welfare book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Cheating Welfare book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Cheating Welfare: Public Assistance and the Criminalization of Poverty as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Criminalizing poverty, writes Gustafson, has "diverted public attention away from poverty and from the nearly forgotten policy goals of. .Gustafson's book is a devastating expose on welfare reform's criminalization of poverty.

Criminalizing poverty, writes Gustafson, has "diverted public attention away from poverty and from the nearly forgotten policy goals of protecting low-income adults and children from the effects of economic instability. It puts into sharp relief how welfare policy today reinforces the cultural biases against the poor while actually working to make the poorest of the poor even poorer.

Keywords: criminalization, welfare, welfare fraud, Fourth Amendment, poverty, crime, public policy. Gustafson, Kaaryn, The Criminalization of Poverty (May 7, 2009)

Keywords: criminalization, welfare, welfare fraud, Fourth Amendment, poverty, crime, public policy. Gustafson, Kaaryn, The Criminalization of Poverty (May 7, 2009). com/abstract 1401107. Kaaryn Gustafson (Contact Author).

Interdisciplinary Group on Poverty and Inequality's Third Annual Conference, University of Michigan School of Social Work, 2011 (Ann Arbor, MI). · Keynote Speaker, The Criminalization of Poverty.

32 critical social policy 287 (2012). Interdisciplinary Group on Poverty and Inequality's Third Annual Conference, University of Michigan School of Social Work, 2011 (Ann Arbor, MI). Conference on Race, Law, and Socioeconomic Class, UC Irvine School of Law, 2011 (Irvine, CA). 5 of 9. Curriculum Vitae.

Gustafson, Kaaryn S.

Cheating Welfare : Public Assistance and the Criminalization of Poverty, New York University Press, 2011. All of these studies problematically assume that welfare recipients know the rules well enough to factor them into their deci- sion making and that complying with the rules and regulations is a choice they can fully exercise. As a result, these studies assume causation between rule changes, individual choice, and policy outcomes when, in fact, there may be less informed choice and direct causation involved than these studies conclude.

Over the last three decades, welfare policies have been informed by popular beliefs that welfare fraud is rampant. As a result, welfare policies have become more punitive and the boundaries between the welfare system and the criminal justice system have blurred—so much so that in some locales prosecution caseloads for welfare fraud exceed welfare caseloads. In reality, some recipients manipulate the welfare system for their own ends, others are gravely hurt by punitive policies, and still others fall somewhere in between.

In Cheating Welfare, Kaaryn S. Gustafson endeavors to clear up these gray areas by providing insights into the history, social construction, and lived experience of welfare. She shows why cheating is all but inevitable—not because poor people are immoral, but because ordinary individuals navigating complex systems of rules are likely to become entangled despite their best efforts. Through an examination of the construction of the crime we know as welfare fraud, which she bases on in-depth interviews with welfare recipients in Northern California, Gustafson challenges readers to question their assumptions about welfare policies, welfare recipients, and crime control in the United States.