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by David Easton,Michael Stein,John G. Gunnell

Author: David Easton,Michael Stein,John G. Gunnell
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press (March 1, 1995)
Pages: 312 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.2
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Is the discipline of political science a specific by-product of democratic regimes? .

Is the discipline of political science a specific by-product of democratic regimes? . The volume then explores the relationship between democracy and the development of political science in a variety of national settings and political regimes, including older Western democracies (such as the United States, Britain, France, and Germany), newer democracies (Japan and other Asian countries), and current transitional regimes (such as Argentina, Hungary, and Poland). The contributions reflect both consensus and disagreement about the nature of the interactive relationship between political science and democracy.

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1995, Regime and Discipline: Democracy and the Development of. .

1995, Regime and Discipline: Democracy and the Development of Political Science, (Ed. with J. Gunnell and M. Stein). John G. Gunnell, "The Reconstitution of Political Theory: David Easton, Behavioralism, and the Long Road to System," Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences (2013) 49 pp 190–210. Gunnell, John G. "The Reconstitution of Political Theory: David Easton, Behavioralism, and the Long Road to System," Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences (2013) 49 pp 190–210.

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Easton, David, 1917-; Gunnell, John G; Stein, Michael . 1940-. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station02. cebu on May 29, 2019.

Imagining the American Polity: American Political Science and the Discourse of Democracy (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004). David Easton, John Gunnell, and Michael Stein (ed., Regime and Discipline:Democracy and the Development of Political Science (University of Michigan Press, 1995). The Descent of Political Theory: The Genealogy of an American Vocation (University of Chicago Press, 1993).

Home Easton, David Regime and Discipline - Democracy and the .

Home Easton, David Regime and Discipline - Democracy and the Development o.David Easton is Andrew Macleish Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, University of Chicago, and distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of California at Irvine. Gunnell is Professor of Political Science, Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy, State University of New York at Albany. Michael B. Stein is Professor of Political Science, McMaster University.

David Easton, John Gunnell, and Michael Stein (ed. David Easton, John Gunnell, and L. Graziano (ed., The Development of Political Science: A Comparative Survey (Routledge, 1991). Between Philosophy and Politics: The Alienation of Political Theory (University of Massachusetts Press, 1986)

Is the discipline of political science a specific by-product of democratic regimes? Can it develop and have an impact only where democracy itself is flourishing? Or is it possible to forge such a discipline in authoritarian and transitional regimes? Can political science shape the democratic process in established democracies? Can it foster liberalization in countries attempting to rid themselves of authoritarian regimes?

The contributors to this volume seek answers to these questions from methodological and substantive perspectives. The methodological debate is presented in terms of whether the goal of objectivity and neutrality in disciplinary history is desirable and attainable, or whether all such histories are inherently "whiggish" or "pessimistic," and mere ex-post facto justifications of a particular disciplinary perspective. The volume then explores the relationship between democracy and the development of political science in a variety of national settings and political regimes, including older Western democracies, newer democracies, and current transitional regimes.

The contributions reflect both consensus and disagreement about the nature of the interactive relationship between political science and democracy. Indeed, a fundamental debate centers on the very terms democracy and political science. Nevertheless, with one or two exceptions, the participants do acknowledge that some kind of relationship does in fact exist between democracy and political science, be it interactive and correlational or causal.