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by James H. Read

Author: James H. Read
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: University of Virginia Press (January 29, 2000)
Pages: 201 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mbr azw lrf lit

James H. Read examines how four key Founders-James Madison

James H. Read examines how four key Founders-James Madison. Read shows how these revolutionaries struggled to reconcile tensions between liberty and power; his important book succeeds admirably in reconstructing a fascinating debate over fundamental questions that continue to command our attention. Historians and theorists alike will gain much from Read's judicious and thoughtful analysis.

James H. Read's survey of four prominent lexander Hamilton, James Madison, James Wilson and Thomas Jefferson-details the conversations that occurred during those post-revolutionary years when the task of balancing power and liberty assumed the utmost. Read's survey of four prominent lexander Hamilton, James Madison, James Wilson and Thomas Jefferson-details the conversations that occurred during those post-revolutionary years when the task of balancing power and liberty assumed the utmost urgency

Read shows how these revolutionaries struggled to reconcile tensions between liberty and power; his important book succeeds admirably in reconstructing a fascinating debate over fundamental questions that continue to command our attention. Historians and theorists alike will gain much from Read's judicious and thoughtful analysis

James H. Read examines how four key Founders-James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson-wrestled with this question during the first two decades of the American Republic. Power versus Liberty reconstructs a four-way es respectful, sometimes shrill-that touched on the most important issues facing the new nation: the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, federal authority versus states' rights, freedom of the press, the controversial Bank of the United States, the relation between nationalism and democracy, and the elusive meaning of "the.

Power Versus Liberty book. James H. Power versus Liberty reconstructs a four-way es respectful, Does every increase in the power of government entail a loss of liberty for the people?

Read, James H. (2000). Power Versus Liberty: Madison, Hamilton, Wilson and Jefferson. Sheehan, Colleen (August 2004). Madison v. Hamilton: The Battle Over Republicanism and the Role of Public Opinion".

Read, James H. Read is Professor of Political Science at the College of St. . Benedict and St. John’s University of Minnesota. He is the author of Majority Rule versus Consensus: the Political Thought of John C. Calhoun (2009), Power versus Liberty: Madison, Hamilton, Wilson, and Jefferson (2000) and Doorstep Democracy: Face to Face Politics in the Heartland (2008). April 30, 2012Federalist 39, James Madison and the Making of America, Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798, Kevin Gutzman, state sovereignty, Virginia Constitutional Ratification Convention. Reading James Madison

James H. Read examines how four key Founders-James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and Thomas . Jefferson believed that every increase in the power of government came at the expense of liberty: energetic governments, he insisted, are always oppressive. Madison believed that this view was too simple, that liberty can be threatened either by too much or too little governmental power.

Theorist-statesmen like Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson were more .

Theorist-statesmen like Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson were more thoughtful and prolific than most in struggling with the critical questions and issues of these years, and no issue absorbed them more than the relationship between power and liberty. Read's work offers a four-way conversation among these thinkers on how best to reconcile the power of government with the liberty of citizens in a republican political system. Power versus Liberty: Madison, Hamilton, Wilson, and Jefferson. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000. Hamilton, Adams, Jefferson: The Politics of the Enlightenment and the American Founding. New York: Hill and Wang, 2005. Historian Ellen Holmes Pearson is an Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina, Asheville. She received her P. in Colonial and Revolutionary American History from The Johns Hopkins University.

Does every increase in the power of government entail a loss of liberty for the people? James H. Read examines how four key Founders--James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson--wrestled with this question during the first two decades of the American Republic.

Power versus Liberty reconstructs a four-way conversation--sometimes respectful, sometimes shrill--that touched on the most important issues facing the new nation: the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, federal authority versus states' rights, freedom of the press, the controversial Bank of the United States, the relation between nationalism and democracy, and the elusive meaning of "the consent of the governed."

Each of the men whose thought Read considers differed on these key questions. Jefferson believed that every increase in the power of government came at the expense of liberty: energetic governments, he insisted, are always oppressive. Madison believed that this view was too simple, that liberty can be threatened either by too much or too little governmental power. Hamilton and Wilson likewise rejected the Jeffersonian view of power and liberty but disagreed with Madison and with each other.

The question of how to reconcile energetic government with the liberty of citizens is as timely today as it was in the first decades of the Republic. It pervades our political discourse and colors our readings of events from the confrontation at Waco to the Oklahoma City bombing to Congressional debate over how to spend the government surplus. While the rhetoric of both major political parties seems to posit a direct relationship between the size of our government and the scope of our political freedoms, the debates of Madison, Hamilton, Wilson, and Jefferson confound such simple dichotomies. As Read concludes, the relation between power and liberty is inherently complex.