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Download Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme Court djvu

by Sandra Day O'Connor

Author: Sandra Day O'Connor
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Language: English
Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (March 5, 2013)
Pages: 256 pages
Category: Politics
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf lrf lit txt

Sandra Day O'Connor provides a mildly insightful and readable book but overall it's disappointing. 3. A brief history of the evolution of the Supreme Court via stories. 4. The book captures many of the historical power struggles between the President and the Supreme Court.

Sandra Day O'Connor provides a mildly insightful and readable book but overall it's disappointing. The book fails to take advantage of the unique insights that a pioneer of O'Connor's caliber would have had. It's a book that quite frankly could have been written by almost any historian. But once fate brought them to their respective positions of authority in 1801, Jefferson and Marshall came to blows in ways that put even today's climate of political acrimony to shame".

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When Sandra Day O'Connor was sworn in as a Supreme Court justice in 1981, the court was at. .O'Connor notes that Daniel Webster - who practiced before the Supreme Court from 1812 to 1852 - is considered one of the most brillliant oral advocates in history.

When Sandra Day O'Connor was sworn in as a Supreme Court justice in 1981, the court was at its present Washington, DC location - a majestic building with marble stairs and bronze doors. However, it took 145 years to get there. Supreme Court Building.

At its best, the book features some incisive analyses of major constitutional cases. An early chapter covers the history and development of the power relationship between the Court and the President with terse analyses of four seminal cases, from Marbury vs. Madison to Youngstown Sheet & Tube (the steel seizure case). O’Connor shines whenever she states the holding of an important case.

history and evolution of the highest court in the land.

Justice Sandra Day O’Connor From Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman to sit on the United States Supreme Court, comes this fascinating book about the. history and evolution of the highest court in the land.

This is a badly misnamed book. The one thing Justice O'Connor could have offered us was the insider's view of the goings on at the Supreme Court Building. Unfortunately, the deepest we get is her revelation that (junior) Justice Kagan has used her position as manager of the cafeteria to introduce yogurt and pretzels to the Supreme Court. I'm sure TMZ will pick up on this any day now. Finally, the book suddenly ends at page 131. That's it.

In many respects, or at least in spots, Sandra Day OConnors fifth book her second dealing with the Supreme Court is useful and engaging. The average reader will learn much from the former Supreme Court Justice who was the first woman to serve on the nations highest court

In many respects, or at least in spots, Sandra Day OConnors fifth book her second dealing with the Supreme Court is useful and engaging. The average reader will learn much from the former Supreme Court Justice who was the first woman to serve on the nations highest court.

Sandra Day O'Connor's new book steps a bit too carefully through any and all political minefields. As O’Connor points out repeatedly, the court has evolved

Sandra Day O'Connor's new book steps a bit too carefully through any and all political minefields. As O’Connor points out repeatedly, the court has evolved. Oral arguments, for example, which once might ramble on for days – and remarkably, uninterrupted by the justices – are limited now to 30 minutes. Today the nine justices do not hear every case that wends its way through the system, but select some 90 a year – or roughly one percent of the 8,000 petitions they receive. Such details are all well and good. They are fodder for a middling, middle school civics textbook.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER“I called this book Out of Order because it reflects my goal, which is to share a different side of the Supreme Court. Most people know the Court only as it exists between bangs of the gavel, when the Court comes to order to hear arguments or give opinions. But the stories of the Court and the Justices that come from the ‘out of order’ moments add to the richness of the Court as both a branch of our government and a human institution.”—Justice Sandra Day O’Connor   From Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman to sit on the United States Supreme Court, comes this fascinating book about the history and evolution of the highest court in the land.   Out of Order sheds light on the centuries of change and upheaval that transformed the Supreme Court from its uncertain beginnings into the remarkable institution that thrives and endures today. From the early days of circuit-riding, when justices who also served as trial judges traveled thousands of miles per year on horseback to hear cases, to the changes in civil rights ushered in by Earl Warren and Thurgood Marshall; from foundational decisions such as Marbury v. Madison to modern-day cases such as Hamdi v. Rumsfeld, Justice O’Connor weaves together stories and lessons from the history of the Court, charting turning points and pivotal moments that have helped define our nation’s progress.   With unparalleled insight and her unique perspective as a history-making figure, Justice O’Connor takes us on a personal exploration, painting vivid pictures of Justices in history, including Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., one of the greatest jurists of all time; Thurgood Marshall, whose understated and succinct style would come to transform oral argument; William O. Douglas, called “The Lone Ranger” because of his impassioned and frequent dissents; and John Roberts, whom Justice O’Connor considers to be the finest practitioner of oral argument she has ever witnessed in Court. We get a rare glimpse into the Supreme Court’s inner workings: how cases are chosen for hearing; the personal relationships that exist among the Justices; and the customs and traditions, both public and private, that bind one generation of jurists to the next—from the seating arrangements at Court lunches to the fiercely competitive basketball games played in the Court Building’s top-floor gymnasium, the so-called “highest court in the land.”   Wise, candid, and assured, Out of Order is a rich offering of inspiring stories of one of our country’s most important institutions, from one of our country’s most respected pioneers.Praise for Out of Order  “[A] succinct, snappy account of how today’s court—so powerful, so controversial and so frequently dissected by the media—evolved from such startlingly humble and uncertain beginnings.”The New York Times   “A brief and accessible history of the nation’s highest court, narrated by a true historical figure and a jurisprudential giant.”—The Boston Globe   “A vibrantly personal book [that] displays O’Connor’s uncommon common sense, her dry wit and her reverence for the nation’s institutions.”Richmond Times-Dispatch   “Full of riveting anecdotes . . . a compact history . . . albeit a more lighthearted, personality-filled one than you might find in a high school classroom.”—Associated Press