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by Hillary Potter

Author: Hillary Potter
Subcategory: Performing Arts
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press (November 1, 2008)
Pages: 295 pages
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt doc lit mobi

Battle Cries is the most comprehensive study of intimate partner abuse in heterosexual Black relationships

Battle Cries is the most comprehensive study of intimate partner abuse in heterosexual Black relationships. Battle Cries makes a significant contribution to the scholarship on domestic violence and our understanding, in particular, of African American women and their experience of and responses to abusive relationships. Her comparative approach to the topic and her class analysis also makes this the most compelling book to be published recently on the challenges facing Black women in the .

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Could it be that women who are abused by their male partners do not become passive "victims" but "survivors" who actively seek help? The authors of "Battered Women as Survivors" answer with a resounding yes. Still, they point out, most modern methods of assistance have centered on the theory that battered women are subject to "learned helplessness," a phenomenon by which they apparently give up or give in to their abuse.

Home Browse Books Book details, Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate Partner. Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate Partner Abuse. The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence on Sexually Transmitted Infections By Williams, Corrine Larsen, Ulla McCloskey, Laura Ann Violence and Victims, Vol. 25, No. 6, 2010.

Intimate partner violence among women with severe mental illness. April 2008 · Psychiatric Times. We examined the usefulness of information cards provided to women disclosing intimate partner violence at a healthcare visit. Nous avons examiné l’utilité de cartes d’information offertes aux femmes qui ont signalé des cas de violence.

Yet, as Hillary Potter argues in Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate .

Yet, as Hillary Potter argues in Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate Partner Abuse, this stereotype often helps these African American women to resist and to verbally and physically retaliate against their abusers. Thanks to this generalization, Potter observes, black women are less inclined to label themselves as "victims" and more inclined to fight back. Battle Cries is an eye-opening examination of African American women's experiences with intimate partner abuse, the methods used to contend with abusive mates, and the immediate and enduring consequences resulting from the.

New York: New York University Press, 2008. New York: New York University Press, 2008.

Hillary Potter is a Black feminist criminologist and resident of Denver, Colorado. Dr. Potter's newest book, Intersectionality and Criminology: Disrupting and Revolutionizing Studies of Crime (Routledge Press) was published in May 2015.

His wife finds him with a younger woman Lead Us Not Into Temptation Part 2 - Продолжительность: 12:45 Cinehouse Recommended for you. 12:45. North West Frontier 1959 (Original Uncut British Release ) Kenneth More, Lauren Bacall - Продолжительность: 2:10:09 DK CLASSICS Recommended for you.

Contrary to the stereotype of the “strong Black woman,” African American women are more plagued by domestic violence than any other racial group in the United States. In fact, African American women experience intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than white women and about two and a half times more than women of other races and ethnicities. This common portrayal can hinder black women seeking help and support simply because those on the outside don't think help is needed. Yet, as Hillary Potter argues in Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate Partner Abuse, this stereotype often helps these African American women to resist and to verbally and physically retaliate against their abusers. Thanks to this generalization, Potter observes, black women are less inclined to label themselves as “victims” and more inclined to fight back.

Battle Cries is an eye-opening examination of African American women's experiences with intimate partner abuse, the methods used to contend with abusive mates, and the immediate and enduring consequences resulting from the maltreatment. Based on intensive interviews with 40 African American women abused by their male partners, Potter's analysis takes into account variations in their experiences based on socioeconomic class, education level, and age, and discusses the common abuses and perceptions they share. Combining her remarkable findings with black feminist thought and critical race theory, Potter offers a unique and significant window through which we can better understand this understudied though rampant social problem.