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by Elissa Auther

Author: Elissa Auther
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press; 1 edition (December 21, 2009)
Pages: 280 pages
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf lrf lit docx

String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the American art world, chronicling the advance of thread has been added to your Cart.

String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the American art world, chronicling the advance of thread has been added to your Cart.

Elissa Auther hierarchy of art over craft. weaves together narratives of art, artists, exhibitions, books, critics, and. historians to tell a big and, as of yet, untold story.

String, Felt, Thread: The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American. Art. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. hierarchy of art over craft. Auther’s examination of that hierarchy makes a. considerable contribution to art history, especially because the art-craft. Auther organizes String, Felt, Thread around three chapters that approach. fiber in art and craft from different perspectives.

String, Felt, Thread book. String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the. In this full-color illustrated volume, Elissa Auther discusses the work of American artists usi String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the American art world, chronicling the advance of thread, rope, string, felt, and fabric from the "low" world of craft to the "high" world of art in the 1960s and 1970s and the emergence today of a craft.

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The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American Ar.

The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American Art. 2009. Author: Elissa Auther. String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the American art world, chronicling the advance of thread, rope, string, felt, and fabric from the low world of craft to the high world of art in the 1960s and 1970s and the emergence today of a craft counterculture. Auther’s book offers important perspectives on blind spots in art history and indispensable background on fiber within the arenas of contemporary art and art criticism.

oceedings{Sorkin2010StringFT, title {String, Felt, Thread: The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American Art Elissa Auther}, author {Jenni Sorkin}, year {2010} }. Jenni Sorkin.

Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY.

String, Felt, Thread: The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American Art. By Elissa Auther.

String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the American art world, chronicling the .

String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the American art world, chronicling the advance of thread, rope, string, felt, and fabric from the "low" world of craft to the "high" world of art in the 1960s and 1970s and the emergence today of a craft counterculture. In this full-color illustrated volume, Elissa Auther discusses the work of American artists using fiber, considering provocative questions of material, process, and intention that bridge the art-craft divide.

String, Felt, Thread presents an unconventional history of the American art world, chronicling the advance of thread, rope, string, felt, and fabric from the "low" world of craft to the "high" world of art in the 1960s and 1970s and the emergence today of a craft counterculture. In this full-color illustrated volume, Elissa Auther discusses the work of American artists using fiber, considering provocative questions of material, process, and intention that bridge the art-craft divide.

Drawn to the aesthetic possibilities and symbolic power of fiber, the artists whose work is explored here-Eva Hesse, Robert Morris, Claire Zeisler, Miriam Schapiro, Faith Ringgold, and others-experimented with materials that previously had been dismissed for their associations with the merely decorative, with "arts and crafts," and with "women's work." In analyzing this shift and these exceptional artists' works, Auther engages far-reaching debates in the art world: What accounts for the distinction between art and craft? Who assigns value to these categories, and who polices the boundaries distinguishing them?

String, Felt, Thread not only illuminates the centrality of fiber to contemporary artistic practice but also uncovers the social dynamics-including the roles of race and gender-that determine how art has historically been defined and valued.