» » The Yoruba Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts
Download The Yoruba Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts djvu

Download The Yoruba Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts djvu

by Museum Rietberg,Rowland Abiodun,Henry John Drewal,John III Pemberton

Author: Museum Rietberg,Rowland Abiodun,Henry John Drewal,John III Pemberton
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Smithsonian Inst Pr (September 1, 1994)
Pages: 287 pages
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf rtf mobi azw

Yoruba artwork is at once powerfully expressive and technically adept

ISBN-13: 978-1560983392. Yoruba artwork is at once powerfully expressive and technically adept.

The Yoruba Artist book.

The Yoruba Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts. Organized by the Center and curated by Henry John Drewal and John Pemberton III, the exhibition presents approximately 100 objects drawn from public and private collections in Africa, Europe, and the United States. Seventeen pieces are on loan from museums in Lagos and Ife; most of these have never before been seen in this country. After closing at the Center for African Art on January 7, 1990, the exhibition will begin a national tour that includes presentations at the Art Institute of Chicago (Feb. 10-April 1, 1990); the National Museum of African Art, Washington, .

Rowland Abiọdun; Henry J. Drewal; John Pemberton III (ed. The Yoruba artist : new theoretical perspectives on African arts ;. Washington : Smithsonian Institution Press. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Drewal, Henry, John Pemberton III, and Rowland Abiodun In The Yorùbá Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts, ed. Rowland Abiodun, Henry Drewal, and John Pemberton.

Drewal, Henry, John Pemberton III, and Rowland Abiodun. In Nine centuries of Yorùbá Art and Thought, ed. Allen Wardwell. Westcott, J. and Peter Morton-Williams. The festival of Iyamapo. In The Yorùbá Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts, ed. Rowland Abiodun, Henry Drewal, and John Pemberton, 107–118. Washington and London: Smithsonian Institution Press.

The Yoruba Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives On African Arts (1994). This book, which deserves the highest recommendation, may well be the finest example of African art scholarship yet published. Smithsonian Institution Press with the support of the Societé Suisse d'Études Africaines and the Rietberg Museum, Switzerland. 275 pp. From Booklist Yoruba artwork is at once powerfully expressive and technically adept.

Drewal and J. Pemberton 3rd, Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994. Let Us Admit That We Have Seen An Elephant : Asiru Olatunde: Retrospective 1961 – 1992. Bayreuth: Iwalewa-Haus, University of Bayreuth, Germany, 1992. Yoruba Art and Aesthetics, Co-authored with . Drewal, and J. Pemberton III, Zurich: Rietberg Museum, 1991

Yoruba: Nine Centuries of African Art and Thought (with John Pemberton III and Rowland .

Yoruba: Nine Centuries of African Art and Thought (with John Pemberton III and Rowland Abiodun). New York: Alfred Knopf and The Center for African Art. 256 pp. 1989. Introspectives: Contemporary Art by Americans and Brazilians of African Descent (with David Driskell). Los Angeles: The California Afro-American Museum. African Art: A Brief Guide to the Collection African Arts, Special Issue entitled "The Arts of Egungun among Yoruba Peoples," XI, 3, April. Traditional Art of the Nigerian Peoples: The Ratner Collection. Museum of African Art. 58 pp. 1976.

Rowland Abiodun is John C. Newton Professor of Art, the History of Art . Newton Professor of Art, the History of Art, and Black Studies at Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts. Chair, Herskovits Book Award Committee, African Studies Association, 1996. Visiting Resident Scholar, Institute for Encounter with the Cultures of Africa, Asia and the Pacific, IWALEWA HAUS, University of Bayreuth, Germany, 1996. Drewal and J. Let Us Admit That We Have Seen An Elephant": Asiru Olatunde: Retrospective 1961 - 1992.

Drewal, Henry . and John Pemberton III, with Rowland Abiodun. Yoruba: Nine Centuries of African Art and Thought.

Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press. Drewal, Henry . New York: Center for African Art in Association with Harry N. Abrams. and Enid Schildkrout. Dynasty and Divinity: Ifẹ̀ Art in Ancient Nigeria. New York: Museum for African Art. Drewal, M. T. 1977. Projections from the Top in Yorùbá Art.

The cultural legacy of the Yoruba people of Nigeria and Benin is one of Africa's oldest and richest, extending for more than nine centuries. Among the most prized achievements of African art are the naturalistic terracotta sculptures produced for the royal Yoruba courts from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries. Also renowned for their beauty and craftsmanship are Yoruba ceremonial swords, elaborate beaded crowns, wood and ivory carvings, embroidered textiles, jewelry, and architectural works.With twenty-seven color reproductions and eighty-one photographs - many published for the first time - accompanying essays by eighteen of the world's foremost Yoruba cultural historians, this book offers the most complete exploration of Yoruba artists and their work to date. Documenting the full spectrum of Yoruba culture, this definitive work extends beyond the visual arts to examine, for the first time, the Yoruba use of such oral traditions as singing and chanting, as well as drumming, dance, and other artistic expressions, including an Ifa divination ritual that involves an interplay of arts.The Yoruba Artist presents the latest in field-research and critical methodology, pointing to new directions in African cultural scholarship. The book explains the intricate linkage of a variety of Yoruba art forms and the role of oriki (praise poetry) songs in the transmission of knowledge. In one essay, Wande Abimbola illustrates how an extended praise poem serves as a source for knowledge concerning a famous eighteenth-century carver in the Old Oyo area. In another, Oba Solomon Babayemi discusses the relationship between oral history preserved by singers and drummers and the architectural history of the palace at Gbongan.In appraising individual figures such as Olowe of Isethis century's most important Yoruba artist - the contributors underscore particular oral and visual codes that identify authorship. Discussing the transition to current cultural forms, the essayists also show how contemporary artists in West Africa and the Americas have revitalized Yoruba aesthetic traditions.