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Download Greater Perfections: The Practice of Garden Theory (Penn Studies in Landscape Architecture) djvu

Download Greater Perfections: The Practice of Garden Theory (Penn Studies in Landscape Architecture) djvu

by John Dixon Hunt

Author: John Dixon Hunt
Subcategory: Architecture
Language: English
Publisher: Univ of Pennsylvania Pr (March 1, 2000)
Pages: 273 pages
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw lrf rtf txt

Hunt explores the meanings of garden and its relationship to other interventions into the natural world

Hunt explores the meanings of garden and its relationship to other interventions into the natural world.

If gardening is most usually thought of as a practical activity, John Dixon Hunt's book .

If gardening is most usually thought of as a practical activity, John Dixon Hunt's book explores the theoretical or conceptual basis of garden art. This involves taking a coherent and large-scale view of the garden in human culture throughout different times and places and treating the garden as the epitome of place-making or what is nowadays termed landscape architecture. Greater Perfections explores the meanings of "garden" and its relationship to other interventions into the natural world. Hunt calls for a new history of landscape architecture as the basis for redirecting its energies and vision into built work, some recent examples of which are considered.

Gardening is usually thought of as a practical activity, but this book explores the conceptual basis of garden art. Taking a broad view of gardens as landscape architecture, it examines the meaning of "garden" and its relationship to other interventions into the natural world.

The book draws on many different historical traditions and archival materials, and undertakes one main historical excursus - into the late-17th century and the figure of John Evelyn.

Hunt defines landscape architecture as exterior . Greater Perfections: The Practice of Garden Theory, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000.

Hunt defines landscape architecture as exterior place-making and sees the garden as having a 'privileged position' within landscape architecture because gardens 'are concentrated or perfected forms of place-making. (Greater Perfection). The use of the term 'picturesque' today is generally limp, gesturing at best towards something visually attractive, perhaps old, quaint or scenic. (The Picturesque Garden in Europe).

While historic landscape gardens and traditional cultural landscapes can't be aimed at anymore because of changes in agriculture and economy the underlying principles can still be helpful. A new concept of the picturesque has been discussed in the art sciences and this concept can be applied to some of the projects shown.

John Dixon Hunt is Professor of the History and Theory of Landscape in the Department of Landscape Architecture at. .

John Dixon Hunt is Professor of the History and Theory of Landscape in the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Design. View your shopping cart Browse Penn Press titles in Art, Architecture, and Garden History Join our mailing list.

Greater Perfections book. Start by marking Greater Perfections: The Practice of Garden Theory as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Cover title: Repton on landscape-gardening and architecture. What a great version of this text - really useful. Repton utilized material from his "Red Book" presentations prepared for clients and cites over 100 locations (p. -16, preliminaries). Many of the hand-colored plates have overslips to show proposed changes in the landscapes. Two plates are tinted.

Greater Perfections explores the meanings of "garden" and its relationship to other interventions into the natural world. -Richard Weston,The Architects' Journa. more).

Hunt explores the meanings of garden and its relationship to other interventions into the natural world. It looks at the role of verbal and visual languages in placemaking as well as how gardens have been represented in the visual and literary arts.'