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Download The Remittance Landscape: Spaces of Migration in Rural Mexico and Urban USA djvu

Download The Remittance Landscape: Spaces of Migration in Rural Mexico and Urban USA djvu

by Sarah Lynn Lopez

Author: Sarah Lynn Lopez
Subcategory: Architecture
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (January 12, 2015)
Pages: 336 pages
Category: Photo and Art
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw rtf doc mobi

Lopez scales up to analyse state involvement. The Remittance Landscape offers an excellent read to scholars and students. in migration studies, geography, anthropology and Latin American studies.

Lopez scales up to analyse state involvement. and power play in the channelling of remittances through the well-known Mex-. ican 3x1 programme, in which the state matches funds invested by hometown. The. cross-cutting analyses and detailed observations show what globalization, so

With The Remittance Landscape. Lopez' detailed observations enable the reader to feel the frustration over the traps embedded in the act of migration - an act as old as the world and as unstoppable as the wind.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. With The Remittance Landscape, Sarah Lynn Lopez offers the first extended look at what is done with that money, and in particular how the building boom that it has generated has changed Mexican towns and villages. Lopez not only identifies a clear correspondence between the flow of remittances and the recent building boom in rural Mexico but also proposes that this construction boom itself motivates migration and changes social and cultural life for migrants and their families.

In a highly readable book, Lopez unpacks the complexity of migration by. .Sarah Lynn Lopez is assistant professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin.

In a highly readable book, Lopez unpacks the complexity of migration by providing an unconventional perspective through an exploration of how migration both influences and is influenced by the built environment.

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In summary, Migrants are financing and mobilizing physical transformations of Mexico’s landscape with money earned in the United States (page 1). This is clear not just in improvements to individual homes, but in artwork and larger-scale infrastructure as well. And financing is occurring not just at an individual level, but also through collective organization

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In The Remittance Landscape, Sarah Lynn Lopez analyzes the impact of migrant led-development on Mexico's rural countryside. Lopez's book adds to work that draws into question the lasting effects of remittances on migrant-sending communities. Her text us the first to examine migration through the lens of the built environment. Lopez's analysis draws on a sophisticated interdisciplinary lens that allows the reader to gain a better understanding of the long-term effects of emigration within migrant villages.

Immigrants in the United States send more than $20 billion every year back to Mexico―one of the largest flows of such remittances in the world. With The Remittance Landscape, Sarah Lynn Lopez offers the first extended look at what is done with that money, and in particular how the building boom that it has generated has changed Mexican towns and villages. Lopez not only identifies a clear correspondence between the flow of remittances and the recent building boom in rural Mexico but also proposes that this construction boom itself motivates migration and changes social and cultural life for migrants and their families. At the same time, migrants are changing the landscapes of cities in the United States: for example, Chicago and Los Angeles are home to buildings explicitly created as headquarters for Mexican workers from several Mexican states such as Jalisco, Michoacán, and Zacatecas. Through careful ethnographic and architectural analysis, and fieldwork on both sides of the border, Lopez brings migrant hometowns to life and positions them within the larger debates about immigration.