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Download Shared Pleasures: A History Of Movie Presentation In The United States (Wisconsin Studies in Film) djvu

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by Douglas Gomery

Author: Douglas Gomery
Subcategory: Industries
Language: English
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press; y First printing edition (April 15, 1992)
Pages: 416 pages
Category: Perfomance
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf docx mbr mobi

By studying film exhibition, Gomery shows how the Hollywood film industry adapted its business policies to diversity and change within American . Series: Wisconsin Studies in Film. Paperback: 416 pages.

By studying film exhibition, Gomery shows how the Hollywood film industry adapted its business policies to diversity and change within American society. Despite the book's concern for broad trends, it keeps firmly before us the concrete experience of moviegoing. Gomery initiates us into the training of ushers in picture palaces, the tactics of games and giveaways during the Depression, and the business logic of 1950s kiddie matinees. We even learn the history of popcorn.

Madison, Wis: University of Wisconsin Press, 1992. ISBN 978-0-299-13214-9 WorldCat. The Hollywood Studio System. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1986. ISBN 978-0-312-38843-0 WorldCat. The Coming of Sound: A History New York: Routledge, 2005. ISBN 0-415-96900-X WorldCat.

Published April 15th 1992 by University of Wisconsin Press. Apr 14, 2007 Bill rated it really liked it. Shelves: thesis2007. Excellent chapter on segregated theaters and black moviegoing practices in the pre-black independent cinema days.

His other books include The Hollywood Studio System, Movie History: A Survey, and four other books examining the economics and history of American media. From Publishers Weekly

Douglas Gomery tells the complete story of the film exhibition business, from the humble nickelodeon to movie palaces to today's mass markets of cable TV and home video rentals. Along the way Gomery shows us how the American economy and society altered going to the movies.

Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty. The Mark of a Criminal Record. Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

Online version: Gomery, Douglas. By studying film exhibition, Gomery shows how the Hollywood film industry adapted its business policies to diversity and change within American society. David Bordwell, from the foreword" Winner of the 1993 Theatre Library Association Award"No existing book covers the fascinating terrain this work surveys.

Serious film buffs will treasure the book’s many nug-gets of offbeat information, even if more casual readers.

and RKO-that dominated the movie industry until the 1950s.

The consistent feature of these monographs is an emphasis on audiences, exhibition, and culture, as opposed to, say, production or criticism.

Volume 67, Issue 3 (German Business History). Autumn 1993, pp. 497-499. ByDouglas Gomery · Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1992. xxii + 381 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, and index.

Shared Pleasures presents the first comprehensive history of how Americans have watched their favorite movies. Douglas Gomery tells the complete story of the film exhibition business, from the humble nickelodeon to movie palaces to today's mass markets of cable TV and home video rentals. Along the way Gomery shows us how the American economy and society altered going to the movies.Shared Pleasures answers such questions as: How and where have Americans gone to the movies? What factors prompted the growth of specialized theaters? To what extent have corporations controlled the means of moviegoing? How has television changed the watching of motion pictures? Gomery analyzes social, technological, and economic transformations inside and outside the movie industry-sound, color (and later, colorization), television movies, cable movie networks, and home video, as well as automobiles, air conditioning, and mass transit. He traces the effects of immigration, growing urban and suburban cultures, two world wars, racial and ethnic segregation, and the baby boom on the movie theater industry, noting such developments as newsreel theaters and art cinemas.

Gomery shows how the movie theater business has remained a profitable industry, transforming movie houses from storefronts to ornate movie palaces to the sticky-floored mall multiplexes of today. Contrary to some gloomy predictions, Gomery contends that movie watching is not declining as a form of entertainment. With the growth of cable TV, home movie rental, and other technical changes, more Americans are watching (and enjoying) more movies than ever before.