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Download Mastering Iron: The Struggle to Modernize an American Industry, 1800-1868 djvu

by Anne Kelly Knowles

Author: Anne Kelly Knowles
Subcategory: Industries
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press (January 15, 2013)
Pages: 336 pages
Category: Perfomance
Rating: 4.3
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In Mastering Iron, Anne Kelly Knowles argues that the prolonged development of the US iron industry was largely due to geographical problems the British did not face.

In Mastering Iron, Anne Kelly Knowles argues that the prolonged development of the US iron industry was largely due to geographical problems the British did not face. University of Chicago Press, 15‏/01‏/2013 - 334 من الصفحات.

Eventually, this vector layer is transformed into a grid format. The work parallels the effort of the Joint. This article provides a decentralized and coordinate-free algorithm, called decentralized gradient field DGraF, to identify critical points peaks, pits, and passes and the topological structure of the surface network connecting those critical points.

In Mastering Iron, Anne Kelly Knowles argues that the prolonged development of the US iron industry was largely due to geographical problems the British did not face

In Mastering Iron, Anne Kelly Knowles argues that the prolonged development of the US iron industry was largely due to geographical problems the British did not face.

This lecture explains the reasons for the . Knowles, Anne Kelly - Lecturer. iron industry's halting, uneven, and often failed efforts to match the scale and technology of British iron-making in the decades leading up to the Civil War. Geography, geology, labor relations, economic cycles and luck all played a part.

In Mastering Iron, Anne Kelly Knowles argues that the prolonged development of the US iron industry was . Anne Kelly Knowles has built a reputation over the past decade for highly innovative applications of GIS in historical scholarship.

Mastering Iron: The Struggle to Modernize an American Industry, 1800–1868. By Anne Kelly Knowles. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. University of Vermont.

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Anne Kelly Knowles (born 1957) is an American geographer and a specialist in Historical GI. Mastering Iron: The Struggle to Modernize an American Industry. University of Chicago Press.

Anne Kelly Knowles (born 1957) is an American geographer and a specialist in Historical GIS. After teaching for over ten years at Middlebury College in Vermont as a professor of geography, she is now a professor of history at University of Maine. She received her MA and PhD from University of Wisconsin–Madison. Redlands, Ca. ESRI Press. Knowles, Anne Kelly ed.

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Veins of iron run deep in the history of America. Iron making began almost as soon as European settlement, with the establishment of the first ironworks in colonial Massachusetts. Yet it was Great Britain that became the Atlantic world’s dominant low-cost, high-volume producer of iron, a position it retained throughout the nineteenth century. It was not until after the Civil War that American iron producers began to match the scale and efficiency of the British iron industry. In Mastering Iron, Anne Kelly Knowles argues that the prolonged development of the US iron industry was largely due to geographical problems the British did not face. Pairing exhaustive manuscript research with analysis of a detailed geospatial database that she built of the industry, Knowles reconstructs the American iron industry in unprecedented depth, from locating hundreds of iron companies in their social and environmental contexts to explaining workplace culture and social relations between workers and managers. She demonstrates how ironworks in Alabama, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia struggled to replicate British technologies but, in the attempt, brought about changes in the American industry that set the stage for the subsequent age of steel. Richly illustrated with dozens of original maps and period art work, all in full color, Mastering Iron sheds new light on American ambitions and highlights the challenges a young nation faced as it grappled with its geographic conditions.