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by John Jung

Author: John Jung
Subcategory: Industries
Language: English
Publisher: Yin & Yang Press (September 2, 2011)
Pages: 312 pages
Category: Perfomance
Rating: 4.8
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Sweet and Sour" examines the history of Chinese family restaurants in the U. S. and Canada

Sweet and Sour" examines the history of Chinese family restaurants in the U. and Canada. Sweet and Sour" examines the history of Chinese family restaurants in the U.

Sweet and Sour examines the history of Chinese family restaurants in the U. Narratives provided by 10 Chinese who grew up in their family restaurants in all parts of the North America provide valuable insights on the role that this ethnic business had on their lives.

Sweet and Sour" examines the history of Chinese family restaurants in the U. .Rate it . You Rated it . had vicious hostility toward Chinese immigrants The goal of "Sweet and Sour" is to understand how the small Chinese family restaurants functioned. Why did many Chinese immigrants enter this business around the end of the 19th century?

How did Chinese restaurants manage to attract non-Chinese customers, given that they had little or no acquaintance with the . The goal of "Sweet and Sour" is to understand how the small Chinese family restaurants functioned.

How did Chinese restaurants manage to attract non-Chinese customers, given that they had little or no acquaintance with the Chinese style of food preparation and many had vicious hostility toward Chinese immigrants? The goal of "Sweet and Sour" is to understand how the small Chinese family restaurants functioned.

The Chinese restaurant Hung Far Low, which means "red flower restaurant" in Cantonese or "almond blossom fragrance" in the . Sweet and Sour: Life in Chinese Family Restaurants. Retrieved January 8, 2016. a b c d e f g Griffin, Anna (August 17, 2010).

The Chinese restaurant Hung Far Low, which means "red flower restaurant" in Cantonese or "almond blossom fragrance" in the Taishanese dialect, was established in 1928 and housed in a building completed in 1916. Located at 112 Northwest 4th Avenue in Portland's Old Town Chinatown neighborhood, the restaurant. was owned by Wong On and open from lunch to early morning. In 1938, the restaurant's proprietor, Jack Wong, purchased the building from the Stubbs family. and Canada

My social history of Chinese family restaurants, "Sweet and Sour: Life in Chinese Family personal stories of children's role in helping parents run their restaurants

My social history of Chinese family restaurants, "Sweet and Sour: Life in Chinese Family personal stories of children's role in helping parents run their restaurants. A Chinese American Odyssey" is a writing memoir about the process and experience of how I, a psychology professor, reinvented myself in retirement to become a public historian of Chinese in America. Being born in Macon, GA and a lifelong resident of central Georgia, I enjoy reading histories of the region and particularly well written memoirs. John Jung's memoir is that and more

"Sweet and Sour" examines the history of Chinese family restaurants in the U. S. and Canada. Why did many Chinese immigrants enter this business around the end of the 19th century? What conditions made it possible for Chinese to open and succeed in operating restaurants after they emigrated to North America? How did Chinese restaurants manage to attract non-Chinese customers, given that they had little or no acquaintance with the Chinese style of food preparation and many had vicious hostility toward Chinese immigrants? The goal of "Sweet and Sour" is to understand how the small Chinese family restaurants functioned. Narratives provided by 10 Chinese who grew up in their family restaurants in all parts of the North America provide valuable insights on the role that this ethnic business had on their lives. Is there any future for this type of immigrant enterprise in the modern world of franchised and corporate owned eateries or will it soon, like the Chinese laundry, be a relic of history?