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by Stephen J. Randall

Author: Stephen J. Randall
Subcategory: Industries
Language: English
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press; 2 edition (June 6, 2005)
Pages: 432 pages
Category: Perfomance
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt rtf mobi lrf

Updating his 1985 book, Stephen J. Randall traces the development of foreign oil policy in the United States from the First World War until shortly after President George W. Bush sent troops into Iraq to topple Saddam Hussein.

Updating his 1985 book, Stephen J. Like most histories of relations between the United States government and private industry, this one presents a story of potential tensions between public and private interests. Randall demonstrates how complementary those interests often were, thus giving readers a solid understanding of the associational nature of the American political economy.

Policy Since World War I Randall demonstrates that . Published April 23rd 2007 by McGill-Queen's University Press (first published January 1st 1985).

Exploring the relationship between the state and the private sector in the development of American foreign oil policy, Stephen Randall argues that policy has been consistently dependant on maintaining a delicate balance between private and public interests - between profits and security. In United States Foreign Oil Policy Since World War I Randall demonstrates that .

I : For Profits and Security. Publisher:McGill-Queen's University Press.

book by Stephen J. Randall. United States Foreign Oil Policy since World War I : For Profits and Security. Through market excesses and shortages, complicated by periodic anxiety over the exhaustion of fossil fuel sources, balancing the international quest for oil with reduction of dependence on foreign oil has been a persistent but elusive goal for .

A timely analysis of American foreign oil policy and the intersection of energy interests and national and international .

A timely analysis of American foreign oil policy and the intersection of energy interests and national and international security interests. Stephen J. Randall is dean, Faculty of Social Sciences, and professor of history, University of Calgary, and the author of many books, including Canada and the United States: Ambivalent Allies. Paperback: 432 pages.

United States Foreign Oil Policy Since World War I: For Profits and Security, by Stephen J. RandallUnited States Foreign Oil Policy Since World War I: For Profits and Security, by Stephen J. Canadian Journal of History University of Toronto Press Inc 0008--8502 1. 138/CJH.

A timely analysis of American foreign oil policy and the intersection of energy interests and national and international security interests. About Stephen J.

Stephen J Randall, Stephen Randall.

August 18, 2005, McGill-Queen's University Press.

United States Foreign Oil Policy Since World War I: For Profits And Security (Mcgill-Queen's Native and Northern Series). August 18, 2005, McGill-Queen's University Press.

Randall demonstrates that .

United States Foreign Oil Policy since World War I offers a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of American global oil policy from the administration of Woodrow Wilson to George W. Bush's current regime. Stephen Randall demonstrates that . His analysis extends from the remote shores of the Caspian Sea in the post-Cold War era to the . s close neighbours such as Canada and Mexico.

United States Foreign Oil Policy, 1919–1948: For Profits and Security. By Stephen J. Toronto: McGill-Queens University Press, 1985. Linda Wills Qaim-Maqami (a1). Texas A&M University.

Through market excesses and shortages, complicated by periodic anxiety over the exhaustion of fossil fuel sources, balancing the international quest for oil with reduction of dependence on foreign oil has been a persistent but elusive goal for U.S. governments. United States Foreign Oil Policy since World War I offers a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of American global oil policy from the administration of Woodrow Wilson to George W. Bush's current regime.Stephen Randall demonstrates that U.S. foreign oil policy since World War I has been consistently based on ensuring an adequate supply of oil and oil products at reasonable prices to meet the industrial and military needs of American society. The result has been an ongoing search for energy security that has taken the United States into regions of the world where its national security interests would not otherwise have been at stake, even at the height of the Cold War.