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by Sydney Watts

Author: Sydney Watts
Subcategory: Economics
Language: English
Publisher: University of Rochester Press (August 24, 2006)
Pages: 244 pages
Category: Perfomance
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt docx rtf mbr

Watts's examination of eighteenth-century market culture reveals why meat mattered to Parisians, as onetime subjects became citizens

In eighteenth century Paris, municipal authorities, guild officers, merchant butchers, stall workers, and tripe dealers pledged to provide a steady supply of healthful meat to urban elites and the working poor. Meat Matters considers the formation of the butcher guild and family firms, debates over royal policy and regulation, and the burgeoning role of consumerism and public health. Watts's examination of eighteenth-century market culture reveals why meat mattered to Parisians, as onetime subjects became citizens. Sydney Watts is assistant professor of history at the University of Richmond.

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In eighteenth century Paris, municipal authorities, guild officers, merchant butchers, stall workers, and tripe dealers pledged to. .Watts's examination of eighteenth-century market culture reveals why meat mattered to Parisians, as onetime subjects became citizens

In eighteenth century Paris, municipal authorities, guild officers, merchant butchers, stall workers, and tripe dealers pledged to provide a steady supply of healthful meat to urban elites and the working poor. She is currently working on the history of Lent and secular society in early modern France.

Series: Changing Perspectives on Early Modern Europe

Series: Changing Perspectives on Early Modern Europe. Paris from the 1680s to 1791 was a place and time of intense political debate and social unrest over issues of subsistence. The shortage of grain and the sudden rise in bread prices sparked the fires of urban protest and drew immediate responses from monarchs and statesmen.

Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe.

Meat Matters: Butchers, Politics, and Market Culture in EighteenthCentury Paris. Changing Perspectives on Early Modern Europe. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2006. Defenestration as Ritual Punishment: Windows, Power, and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe. Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965. An Identity of Opinion: Historians and July 1914.

Changing perspectives on early modern Europe, 1542-3905. Entering into the butcher's world of work, this book reveals the breadth and significance of meat matters as well as the extent to which meat does matter. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 213-223) and index. Summary, et. "Paris from the 1680s to 1791 was a place and time of intense political debate and social unrest over issues of subsistence. Uniform Title: Changing perspectives on early modern Europe.

In this book, Watts examines why meat mattered to a growing number of.

In eighteenth century Paris, municipal authorities, guild officers, merchant butchers, stall workers, and tripe dealers pledged to provide a steady supply of healthful meat to urban elites and the working poor.

Meat Matters: Butchers, Politics, and Market Culture in Eighteenth-Century Paris. New York: University of Rochester Press, 2006. Recommend this journal.

In eighteenth century Paris, municipal authorities, guild officers, merchant butchers, stall workers, and tripe dealers pledged to provide a steady supply of healthful meat to urban elites and the working poor

In eighteenth century Paris, municipal authorities, guild officers, merchant butchers, stall workers, and tripe dealers pledged to provide a steady supply of healthful meat to urban elites and the working poor.

In eighteenth century Paris, municipal authorities, guild officers, merchant butchers, stall workers, and tripe dealers pledged to provide a steady supply of healthful meat to urban elites and the working poor. Meat Matters considers the formation of the butcher guild and family firms, debates over royal policy and regulation, and the burgeoning role of consumerism and public health. The production and consumption of meat becomes a window on important aspects of eighteenth-century culture, society, and politics, on class relations, and on economic change. Watts's examination of eighteenth-century market culture reveals why meat mattered to Parisians, as onetime subjects became citizens. Sydney Watts is Assistant Professor of history at the University of Richmond. She is currently working on the history of Lent and secular society in early modern France.