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by Pamela Brandwein

Author: Pamela Brandwein
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (February 21, 2011)
Pages: 282 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
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Pamela Brandwein in Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction (2011) continues the reevaluation of the Waite Court (1874-1888) as unfairly condemned for undermining Republican Reconstruction.

Pamela Brandwein in Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction (2011) continues the reevaluation of the Waite Court (1874-1888) as unfairly condemned for undermining Republican Reconstruction. This is a thorough examination of the relationship of Supreme Court and lower Federal Court opinions construing the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments and Reconstruction era civil rights legislation through the early 20th century.

Cambridge Core - American Government, Politics and Policy - Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction . Brandwein, Pamela (2006) Studying the Careers of Knowledge Claims: Bringing Science Studies to Legal Studies.

Cambridge Core - American Government, Politics and Policy - Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction - by Pamela Brandwein. Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe.

Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction demolishes the conventional wisdom - and puts a constructive alternative in its place. Pamela Brandwein unveils a lost jurisprudence of rights that provided expansive possibilities for protecting blacks' physical safety and electoral participation, even as it left public accommodation rights undefended. She shows that the Supreme Court supported a Republican coalition and left open ample room for executive and legislative action. Blacks were abandoned, but by the president and Congress, not the Court.

Cambridge Studies on the American Constitution (4 books). Books by Pamela Brandwein.

Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction demolishes the conventional wisdom and puts a constructive alternative in its place. Pamela Brandwein argues instead that the Supreme Court was dedicated to a brand of civil rights up until Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896, when the Court finally turned, along with the rest of the country, away from the task of protecting blacks and minorities. Cambridge Studies on the American Constitution (4 books).

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Michael Kent Curtis, "Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction, by Pamela Brandwein," American Political Thought 1, no. 1 (Spring 2012): 161-165.

Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Michael Kent Curtis, "Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction, by Pamela Brandwein," American Political Thought 1, no. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Our Republican Example : The Significance of the American Experiments in Government in the Twenty-First Century. Federalism, Devolution, and Liberty.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Published: 1 May 2012. by University of Chicago Press. in American Political Thought. American Political Thought, Volume 1, pp 161-165; doi:10. Keywords: Cambridge University, Pamela Brandwein, Judicial Settlement, University Press, Rethinking, reconstruction.

Pamela Brandwein unveils a lost jurisprudence of rights and redefines the legal .

Pamela Brandwein unveils a lost jurisprudence of rights and redefines the legal transition to Jim Crow. American constitutional lawyers and legal historians routinely assert that the Supreme Court's state action doctrine halted Reconstruction in its tracks. Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction demolishes the conventional wisdom - and puts a constructive alternative in its place.

this Essay run counter to 7 Pamela Brandwein, Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 7, 10, 182-186; Elliott, Color-Blind Justice, 248; Rebecca J. Scott, Degrees of Freedom: Louisiana and Cuba after Slavery. Scott, Degrees of Freedom: Louisiana and Cuba after Slavery (Cambridge, Mass.

Her second book, Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction (Cambridge University Press, 2011), revises conventional wisdom about the Supreme Court’s state action doctrine, commonly viewed as an abandonment of blacks to Southern home rule.

American constitutional lawyers and legal historians routinely assert that the Supreme Court's state action doctrine halted Reconstruction in its tracks. But it didn't. Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction demolishes the conventional wisdom - and puts a constructive alternative in its place. Pamela Brandwein unveils a lost jurisprudence of rights that provided expansive possibilities for protecting blacks' physical safety and electoral participation, even as it left public accommodation rights undefended. She shows that the Supreme Court supported a Republican coalition and left open ample room for executive and legislative action. Blacks were abandoned, but by the president and Congress, not the Court. Brandwein unites close legal reading of judicial opinions (some hitherto unknown), sustained historical work, the study of political institutions, and the sociology of knowledge. This book explodes tired old debates and will provoke new ones.