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by Arthur P. Monahan

Author: Arthur P. Monahan
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Carleton University Press; 1 edition (February 1, 1987)
Pages: 368 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: azw lrf rtf lrf

Series: McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas

Series: McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas. Published by: McGill-Queen's University Press. In addition, he deals with the development of these concepts in Roman and canon law and in the practices of the emerging states of France and England and the Italian city-states, as well as considering works in legal and administrative theory and constitutional documents. In each case his interpretations are placed in the wider contexts of developments in law, church, and administrative reform.

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The concepts of popular consent and limit as applied to the exercise of political authority are fundamental features of parliamentary democracy. Both these concepts played a role in medieval political theorizing, although the meaning and significance of political consent in this thought has not been well understood. The result is the first complete study of these three crucial terms as used in the Middle Ages, as well as an excellent summary of work done in a number of specialized fields over the last twenty-five years.

McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas. Toronto: McGill-Queen's University Press. Recommend this journal. Journal of British Studies.

Consent, Coercion and Limit: The Medieval Origins of Parliamentary Democracy. Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. Plena Potestas and Consent in Medieval Assemblies: A Study in Romano-canonical Procedure and the Rise of Representation 1150–1325. Traditio, 1, 355–408. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Arthur P. Monahan, Consent, Coercion, and Limit: The Medieval Origins of Parliamentary Democracy. McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas, 1. Kingston and Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1987.

McGill-Queen's studies in the history of ideas, 0711-0995 ; 10. General Note: Includes index. Representative government and representation History Democracy Consent (Law) Duress (Law) Law, Medieval. Bibliography, etc. Note: Bibliography: p. -325. Uniform Title: McGill-Queen's studies in the history of ideas ; no. 10. Rubrics: Representative government and representation History Democracy Consent (Law) Duress (Law) Law, Medieval. by with 197 ill. by E. W. Kemble. 95 Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910.

Arthur P. Monahan," Speculum 64, no. 3 (Ju. 1989): 745-746. Doing Things beside Domesday Book. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis. The Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction. Birnbaum et al. Artificial Paleography: Computational Approaches to Identifying Script Types in Medieval Manuscripts. Kestemont et al. Who Owns the Money? Currency, Property, and Popular Sovereignty in Nicole Oresme’s De moneta.

In addition, he deals with the development of these concepts in Roman and canon law and in the practices of the emerging states of France and England and the Italian city-states, as well as considering works in legal and administrative theory and constitutional documents. In each case his interpretations are placed in the wider contexts of developments in law, church, and administrative reform. The result is the first complete study of these three crucial terms as used in the Middle Ages, as well as an excellent summary of work done in a number of specialized fields over the last twenty-five years. The book is of considerable importance not only to medieval studies but to the history of political theory and to political theory itself. It brings together and explains the relevance of a vast amount of material previously known only to a few specialists, documenting Monahan's argument that later political thought has been significantly influenced by medieval formulations of the concepts of consent, coercion, and limit.