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Download Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers (Studies in the History of Science, Technology Medicine) djvu

by David Turnbull

Author: David Turnbull
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (August 3, 2000)
Pages: 276 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt lit lrf lrf

Series: Studies in the History of Science, Technology & Medicine.

Series: Studies in the History of Science, Technology & Medicine. Turnbull's work encompasses quite of an eclectic array of case studies (ranging from Gothic cathedral building knowledge transference to Micronesian navigation or the 'art/science' of the cartographers) where he analyses knowledge production and the intricacies to transfer (by transforming) such knowledge.

Science and technology have created many of the problems besetting us at the turn of the century, yet, paradoxically, we cannot address them without their assistance. This beautifully illustrated book takes a fresh approach to resolving the problems of progress and modernity by reframing science and technology.

It is also one of the most interesting.

Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers book. However, sociologist Turnbull's writing style made history so engaging that I ended up reading many other chapters. It is also one of the most interesting. The author explores different kinds of knowledge, how they are standardized and stabilized (giving continuity and predictability) and how they are made transportable this means how the knowledge and practices get from one site to another.

Items related to Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers (Studies in th. .This beautiful, passionate and inspiring book is essential reading for everyone interested in post colonialism and science and technology studies

Items related to Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers (Studies in th.David Turnbull Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers (Studies in the History of Science, Technology & Medicine). ISBN 13: 9789058230010. This beautiful, passionate and inspiring book is essential reading for everyone interested in post colonialism and science and technology studies. John Law of History of Consciousness Department, University of California at Santa Cruz "Turnbull is an innovative theorist and astute writer, and this book makes a major contribution to our understanding of the ways knowledge practices work.

Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers : Comparative Studies in the Sociology of Scientific and Indigenous .

Masons, Tricksters and Cartographers : Comparative Studies in the Sociology of Scientific and Indigenous Knowledge. He argues that all our differing ways of producing knowledge - including science - are messy, spatial and local.

He argues that all our differing ways of producing knowledge - including science - are messy, spatial and local.

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Request PDF On Mar 1, 2002, Pamela O. Long and others published :Masons, Tricksters, and Cartographers: Comparative Studies .

I attempt to relativize allopathic medicine, or Modern Establishment Medicine (MEM), specifically in the context of the ayurvedic medical system of India, and to promote Daniel Moerman’s concept of the medical meaning response as a preferable conceptualization of the phenomena usually subsumed under the name placebo.

In an eclectic and highly original study, Turnbull brings together traditions as diverse as cathedral building, Micronesian navigation, cartography and turbulence research. He argues that all our differing ways of producing knowledge - including science - are messy, spatial and local. Every culture has its own ways of assembling local knowledge, thereby creating space thrugh the linking of people, practices and places. The spaces we inhabit and assemblages we work with are not as homogenous and coherent as our modernist perspectives have led us to believe - rather they are complex and heterogeneous motleys.