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Download Social Capital and Education:The Case of Busia District, Western Kenya: How Social Capital influences student education outcomes in a relatively materially deprived rural community in Kenya djvu

Download Social Capital and Education:The Case of Busia District, Western Kenya: How Social Capital influences student education outcomes in a relatively materially deprived rural community in Kenya djvu

by John Mulaa

Author: John Mulaa
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller (November 19, 2008)
Pages: 208 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: rtf mbr azw lit

Bibliographic Details  . Dr John Mulaa currently works as consultant, World Bank Washington DC. His background is in education and communications, and he juggles between the two professions.

Bibliographic Details Publisher: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller. Publication Date: 2008. Visit Seller's Storefront.

General Educational Books. Walmart 9783639004724. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect.

The Kenya Institute of Social Work and Community Development (KISWCD) is a community-focused development and training institution without any governmental, religious or political affiliation. It was registered by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology on 22 August 2002 as a training institution.

San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

The mechanisms of education's social functions. Education should contribute to social cohesion in four ways. This is particularly the case when teaching local history

The mechanisms of education's social functions. First, schools ought to teach the rules of the game: those that govern interpersonal and political action. This is particularly the case when teaching local history. Some teachers avoid areas where problems are likely; some address sensitive areas more fully; others proactively seek out opinions and views to ensure that consensus is reached over what and how to teach. Schools differ also in the success of these efforts.

This book examines the interplay between education outcomes and social capital, a term that has come in vogue to describe a combination of forms of social organization, and social intercation, that enhance positive outcomes in society. The argument can be made that, as the term implies, social capital is a resource that is crucial to socitey's wellbeing, growth and development. Its presence or ansence in part expalainse why socities at similar levels of development, by conventinal measures, sometimes have varyig if not vastly different outcomes in many areas. Social capital is considered a crucial ingredient that influences the difference. The policy implication is obvious: pay equal attention to assisting socities develop positive elements within their stuctures.