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by Seymour Martin Lipset

Author: Seymour Martin Lipset
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Transaction Publishers; 1 edition (January 1, 1990)
Pages: 288 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
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Seymour Martin Lipset was an American political sociologist, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and the Hazel Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University

Seymour Martin Lipset was an American political sociologist, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and the Hazel Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University. His major work was in the fields of political sociology, trade union organization, social stratification, public opinion, and the sociology of intellectual life.

In their latest collaboratio. eymour Martin Lipset and Earl Raab issue a stern warning to American Jews: Return to your roots or dissolve into the melting pot. These seasoned observers of the Jewish community survey Jewish life in America since the earliest days of the Republic. These seasoned observers of the Jewish community survey Jewish life in America since the earliest days of the Republic and conclude that a ‘basic dwindling cycle is evident’ precisely because Jews have adapted to to America so successfully. have written an important book, and their pessimism about the future of American Jewry is well-founded. Jay P. Lefkowitz, The Wall Street Journal. Some very keen analyses.

Lipset, Seymour Martin. Jewish Sociologists and Sociologists of the Jews, Jewish Social Studies. Lipset, Seymour Martin. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books. The Educational Background of American Jews. Boston and Los Angeles: The Wilstein Institute.

Seymour Martin Lipset (March 18, 1922 – December 31, 2006) was an American sociologist. He also wrote extensively about the conditions for democracy in comparative perspective. A socialist in his early life, Lipset later moved to the right, and was often considered a neoconservative.

Seymour Martin Lipset is the distinguished author of more than 20 books of sociology and political science. Even more unusual for an American, he has a deep and enduring interest in Canada. Continental Divide (1989) is still the best comparative study of Canadian and American institutions and values. Comparison is the key to Lipset's approach since, as he says, to know only one country is to know none.

David Biale and Fred Rosenbaum, "The Pope Comes to San Francisco: An Anatomy of a Crisis in Jewish Community Relations, in Seymour Martin Lipset, e. American Pluralism and the Jewish Community (New Brunswick: Transaction Books, 1990), 243-262. Download with Google. David Biale and Fred Rosenbaum, "The Pope Comes to San Francisco: An Anatomy of a Crisis in Jewish Community Relations, in Seymour Martin Lipset, e.

This is the conundrum that Seymour Lipset and Earl Raab explore in their wise and learned book about the American Jewish experience. Jews, perhaps more than any ethnic or religious minority that has immigrated to these shores, have benefited from the country's openness, egalitarianism, and social heterogeneity.

Seymour Martin Lipset (March 18, 1922–December 31, 2006) was an American political sociologist, senior . Lipset received the MacIver Prize for Political Man (1960) and the Gunnar Myrdal Prize for The Politics of Unreason.

Seymour Martin Lipset (March 18, 1922–December 31, 2006) was an American political sociologist, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, and the Hazel Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University. His book The First New Nation was a finalist for the National Book Award.

In their latest collaboration.

In a landmark volume of new essays destined to reshape the parameters of future discourse on American Jews and their relationships to major ideologies and organization of our time, Lipset has brought together many of the finest social analysts of Jewish life—both in the United States and overseas. Indeed, Canadian and Israeli perspectives add a comparative dimension that increases the special value of this book.

S. N. Eisenstadt calls attention in his opening chapter to the thrust of the volume as a whole: a focus on the most distinguishing aspect of the American Jewish experience—the incorporation of Jews into all arenas and aspects of American life, and the effects of such incorporation on the structuring of Jewish life and self-perception. The work emphasizes the burgeoning of Jewish institutions, the visibility and acceptability of such institutions, and the changing Jewish definition of their collective identity. The work is conceived of as Festschrift, essays in honor of Earl Raab. Thus, the work has a community dimension that typifies Raab's work.

The four essays in the final segment—"California is Different"—will come as a pleasant bonus in a work that otherwise features the more global dimensions of Jewish life in America. The first section on the "North American Community" features essays by S. N. Eisenstadt, Nathan Glazer, Arnold Eisen, Chaim Waxman, and Morton Weinfield. The second section on "Politics" contains contributions by Irving Kristol, Carl Sheingold, Eyton Gilboa, and Alan Fisher. The third segment is on "Jewish Community Life" with essays by Daniel Elezar, Larry Ruben, and Arnold Dashevsky. This is, in short, a major collective statement by scholars long associated with the subject. It will be of interest to political scientists and sociologists interested in ethnic studies and Jewish life in America.