» » Really Raising Standards: Cognitive Intervention and Academic Achievement
Download Really Raising Standards: Cognitive Intervention and Academic Achievement djvu

Download Really Raising Standards: Cognitive Intervention and Academic Achievement djvu

by Philip Adey

Author: Philip Adey
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge (May 6, 1994)
Pages: 224 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf rtf lrf doc

Really Raising Standards book.

Really Raising Standards book.

Really raising standards Appendix: Added value. Philip Adey is now Senior Lecturer in Science Education at King's College, London. Michael Shayer is Director of the CASE III project. They are the authors of the successful Towards a Science of Science Teaching (1981).

Philip Adey is now Senior Lecturer in Science Education at King's College, London. Michael Shayer is Director of the CASE III project

Philip Adey is now Senior Lecturer in Science Education at King's College, London.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781134853687, 1134853688. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781138137424, 1138137421. Note that the availability of products for purchase is based on the country of your billing address. Some items may have regional restrictions for purchase. Canadian customers may purchase from our stores in Canada or the US. Canada.

Cognitive intervention and academic achievement. ByPhilip Adey, Dr Michael Shayer, MICHAEL Shayer. First Published 1994.

This work explores the psychological theory underlying methods of intervention in cognitive development. The authors, strive to show how the practical expression of such methods can lead to long-term gains in academic achievement in ordinary schools. Within a discussion of various attempts to "teach thinking", the design, delivery and results of the "Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education" (CASE) project are described. Other programmes such as Feuerstein's "Instrumental Enrichment" are also described, to abstract the features of successful intervention programmes. Key implications are also discussed for: teaching methods; the nature of the curriculum; teacher education; and educational policy at school, local and national levels. Having established the distinction between intervention and instruction, the authors go on to show how a population, and the learning demands made upon it, can be described in terms of levels of cognitive delvelopment. The emphasis then turns to how the current profile of thinking in schools can be changed through constructivist and metacognitive strategies.