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by Sonya Salamon

Author: Sonya Salamon
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (September 1, 2007)
Pages: 245 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.4
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In this book, Sonya Salamon explores these rural newcomers and the impact they have on the social relationships, public spaces . An illustration of the recent revitalization of interest in the small town, Salamon's work provides a significant addition to the growing literature on the subject.

In this book, Sonya Salamon explores these rural newcomers and the impact they have on the social relationships, public spaces, and community resources of small town America. Salamon draws on richly detailed ethnographic studies of six small towns in central Illinois, including a town with upscale subdivisions that lured wealthy professionals as well as towns whose agribusinesses drew working-class Mexicano migrants and immigrants.

In this book, Sonya Salamon explores these rural newcomers and the impact they have on the social relationships, public . To successfully combat the homogenization of the heartland, Salamon argues, newcomers must work with oldtimers so that together they sustain the vital aspects of community life and identity that first drew them to small towns.

Our Town: Newcomers to Old Towns: Suburbanization of the Heartland by Sonya Salamon. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003, 264 Pages. William R. Freudenburg. Published: 1 February 2004. by University of California Press. Contexts, Volume 3, pp 64-65; doi:10.

Although the death of the small town has been predicted for decades, during the 1990s the population of rural America . I recommend this book to any "newcomer," such as myself, to become familar with how "old-timers" think, act and live.

Although the death of the small town has been predicted for decades, during the 1990s the population of rural America actually increased by more than three million. It gave me a real appreciation for my "new" small town, which fortunately still has a great sense of community.

The book is about migration to rural Midwestern towns in Illinois that are typically characterized as close knit, agrarian, and egalitarian. Comparisons are drawn between demographically dormant towns, affluent residential towns, and mixed economy towns. The text provides several case studies of Latino migration to these types of towns.

Sonya Salamon, Newcomers to Old Towns: Suburbanization of the Heartland, University of Chicago Press, 2003. 0 226 73412 9. Ralph B. Brown (a1). Published online by Cambridge University Press: 17 March 2004.

Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth is a 2018 non-fiction book by American journalist Sarah Smarsh

Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth is a 2018 non-fiction book by American journalist Sarah Smarsh. The book contains events from her life and the lives of her relatives, and it focuses on cycles of poverty and social class in the . Heartland was a finalist for the National Book Award for nonfiction in 2018.

2004 winner of the Robert E. Park Book Award from the Community and Urban Sociology Section (CUSS) of the American Sociological Association Although the death of the small town has been predicted for decades, during the 1990s the population of rural America actually increased. Park Book Award from the Community and Urban Sociology Section (CUSS) of the American Sociological Association Although the death of the small town has been predicted for decades, during the 1990s the population of rural America actually increased by more than three mill.

Newcomers to Old Towns: Suburbanization of the Heartland. Winner of the 2004 Robert E. Park Book Award for best work on community, American Sociological Association, Community and Urban Sociology Section. Change in small Illinois prairie towns is examined ethnographically after various newcomers move-in during the 1990s. Newcomers and oldtimers work together in some towns and clash in others. Newcomers’ priorities are shown as refashioning the rural Midwest, into a post-agrarian region with a more suburbanized culture and way of life.

2004 winner of the Robert E. Park Book Award from the Community and Urban Sociology Section (CUSS) of the American Sociological AssociationAlthough the death of the small town has been predicted for decades, during the 1990s the population of rural America actually increased by more than three million people. In this book, Sonya Salamon explores these rural newcomers and the impact they have on the social relationships, public spaces, and community resources of small town America.Salamon draws on richly detailed ethnographic studies of six small towns in central Illinois, including a town with upscale subdivisions that lured wealthy professionals as well as towns whose agribusinesses drew working-class Mexicano migrants and immigrants. She finds that regardless of the class or ethnicity of the newcomers, if their social status differs relative to that of oldtimers, their effect on a town has been the same: suburbanization that erodes the close-knit small town community, with especially severe consequences for small town youth. To successfully combat the homogenization of the heartland, Salamon argues, newcomers must work with oldtimers so that together they sustain the vital aspects of community life and identity that first drew them to small towns.An illustration of the recent revitalization of interest in the small town, Salamon's work provides a significant addition to the growing literature on the subject. Social scientists, sociologists, policymakers, and urban planners will appreciate this important contribution to the ongoing discussion of social capital and the transformation in the study and definition of communities.