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by Lawrence C. Rubin

Author: Lawrence C. Rubin
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers (May 2, 2006)
Pages: 227 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit mbr mobi lrf

Psychotropic drugs-those intended to change moods, numb anxiety, calm children-are pervasive in American culture.

Psychotropic drugs-those intended to change moods, numb anxiety, calm children-are pervasive in American culture. References are everywhere: not just in print and electronic advertisements but in television show dialogue, movies, song lyrics, and on advertising paraphernalia like notepads, wall clocks, mouse pads, coffee mugs, pens and pencils. The authors in this Psychotropic drugs-those intended to change moods, numb anxiety, calm children-are pervasive in American culture

Background: Drawing on the work of the late French philosophers Deleuze and Guattari, the objective of this paper is to demonstrate that the evidence-based movement in the health sciences is outrageously exclusionary and dangerously normative with regards to scientific knowledge.

Background: Drawing on the work of the late French philosophers Deleuze and Guattari, the objective of this paper is to demonstrate that the evidence-based movement in the health sciences is outrageously exclusionary and dangerously normative with regards to scientific knowledge. As such, we assert that the evidence-based movement in health sciences constitutes a good example of microfascism at play in the contemporary scientific arena

Psychotropic Drugs and Popular Culture : Essays on Medicine, Mental Health and the Media. by Lawrence C. Rubin. Psychotropic drugs-those intended to change moods, numb anxiety, calm children-are pervasive in American culture.

His books include Psychotropic Drugs and Popular Culture: Medicine, Mental Health and the Media (which won the 2006 Ray and Pat Browne award for best anthology), Food for Thought: Essays on Eating and Culture, Popular Culture in Counseling, Psychotherapy an. .

He blogs for Psychology Today on popular culture and psychology. Customers Also Bought Items By.

His book, Psychotropic Drugs and Popular Culture: Medicine, Mental Health and the Media, won the 2006 Ray and Pat Browne Award for Best Anthology

His book, Psychotropic Drugs and Popular Culture: Medicine, Mental Health and the Media, won the 2006 Ray and Pat Browne Award for Best Anthology.

The drugs are intended to help, but many patients say they are dangerously habit forming and have debilitating side effects. The darker side of America’s mental health. Even young children are being put on psychiatric drugs. If parents decline such treatment, social services may intervene.

A Psychoactive drug or Psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system .

A Psychoactive drug or Psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain functions, resulting in perception, mood, consciousness, and behavior. These drugs may be used recreationally to purposefully alter one’s consciousness, as entheogens for ritual or spiritual purposes, as a tool for studying or augmenting the mind or therapeutically as medication. org ). 2 pages, 768 words. The Essay on Assisted Suicide Physician Patient Medication.

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 2007;46(5):660-661. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 2006;45(9): 1142-1143. Transcultural Psychiatry 2000. Carson NJ. Ethnopsychiatry and theories of the African mind. McGill Journal of Medicine 1997

Psychotropic Drugs and Popular Culture: Essays on Medicine, Mental Health and the Media.

OTHER-ID: 7D40001B825F. Source: MLA International Bibliography. On the Wings of Icarus: Exploring the Flawed Superhero. OTHER-ID: 7D47001B8218. Superheroes on the Couch: Exploring Our Limits. 2012 journal-article. Psychotropic Drugs and Popular Culture: Essays on Medicine, Mental Health and the Media. Source: Lawrence C.

Psychotropic drugs—those intended to change moods, numb anxiety, calm children—are pervasive in American culture. References are everywhere: not just in print and electronic advertisements but in television show dialogue, movies, song lyrics, and on advertising paraphernalia like notepads, wall clocks, mouse pads, coffee mugs, pens and pencils. The authors in this compilation of essays on psychotropic drugs and mass culture contend that society has been transformed into an asylum without walls—a “psychotropia.” With each new definition of a mental ailment, a new cure is offered, increasing the number of inmates in this borderless asylum and blurring the lines between mental health and mental illness. Eight essays probe this issue, with an introduction and conclusion by the editor. The introduction frames the topic in the dehumanized asylums brought to light in 1961 by sociologist Erving Goffman, and in author Marshall McLuhan’s warning not to be seduced by the media. Essay topics cover: how psychotropia came to be; drug portrayal in Hollywood; advertising in cyberspace and the postmodern condition; the advertising madness that promotes better living through chemistry; food as medicine; the music culture of psychotropia; children and psychotropic drugs; and stereotypes and manipulation in mass marketing.