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Download The Early Effects of Radiation on DNA (Nato ASI Subseries H:) djvu

by E.M. Fielden,Peter O'Neill

Author: E.M. Fielden,Peter O'Neill
Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (August 5, 1991)
Pages: 430 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw lit lrf lrf

Bibliographic Information.

Interest in the biological effects of ionising radiation closely followed the identification of such radiation. The realisation that DNA is the site of genetic infonnation in cells subsequently focussed attention on DNA as an important target in the lethal and mutagenic effects of ionising radiation. Thus radiation effects upon DNA became an important area for fundamental scientific studies by radiation biologists, chemists and physicists. Bibliographic Information.

NATO ASI series, Series A, Life Sciences 124: 425–438Google Scholar. O’Neill P. (eds) The Early Effects of Radiation on DNA. NATO ASI Series (Series H: Cell Biology), vol 54. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. O’Neill P, Al-Kazwini AT, Land EJ, Fielden EM (1989) Diffuse reflectance pulse radiolysis of solid DNA: the effect of hydration. Painter RB (1979) The role of DNA damage and repair in cell killing induced by ionizing radiation. Raven Press, New York, pp. 59–68Google Scholar.

Start by marking The Early Effects of Radiation on DNA as Want to Read . The latest theories and results on the early effects of radiation on DNA are presented and summarised in this text.

Start by marking The Early Effects of Radiation on DNA as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Contributions are made by leading radiation physicists, chemists and biologists. All three subject areas have shown great advances in recent years, . the computer codes and Monte Carlo calculations used by physicists, the deeper understanding of free radic The latest theories and results on the early effects of radiation on DNA are presented and summarised in this text.

442 pages, 120 illustrations, 34 tables. Publisher: Springer Nature. The latest theories and results on the early effects of radiation on DNA are presented and summarized in this text. Proceedings Out of Print.

Effects of ionising radiation on DNA and related systems: the role of oxygen. O'Neill, . Al-Kazwini, A. Lan, E. J. & Fielden, E. M. 1990

Effects of ionising radiation on DNA and related systems: the role of oxygen. Journal of the Chemical Society, Perkin Transactions II, 1393. Brivati, J. Symons, M. C. Tinling, D. & Wardale, H. W. 1967. Electron spin resonance studies of hydroxyl radicals in irradiated ice crystals. Journal of the Chemical Society, Faraday Transactions 63, 2112–19. 1990. Early chemical events in the development of radiation damage in DNA. In Fielden, E. & O'Neill, P. (Eds) The early effects of radiation on DNA, Vol. 54, pp. 125–40. Peterson, R. R. & Taiwo, F. A. 1989.

Early Chemical Events in the Development of Radiation Damage of DNA - Novel Approaches. The various effects of ionising radiation in biological systems are generally thought to be a consequence of chemical modifications induced within DNA (Painter, 1979). Indeed DNA is generally accepted to be the major target which is sensitive to ionising radiation resulting in the various biological effects determined. Following the initial energy deposition events, the radiation-induced damages to DNA most generally measured in biological systems are single and double strand breaks and modified bases.

Radiation-induced double-strand modification in calf thymus DNA in the presence of 1,2-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone and its Cu. .The Early Effects of Radiation on DNA. E. Martin Fielden, Paul.

Radiation-induced double-strand modification in calf thymus DNA in the presence of 1,2-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone and its Cu(II) complex. Someskumar Das, Abhijit Saha, Parikshit Chandra Mandal. Environmental health perspectives. Mechanisms of DNA Damage and Repair.

NATO ASI Series Advanced Science Institutes Series .

NATO ASI Series Advanced Science Institutes Series,sasw. The Series is published by an international board of publishers in conjunction with the NATO Scientific Affairs Division. None proved to represent DNA from the albino deletion complex, indicating that a cDNA for the perinatal survival locus had not itself been recovered (Ruppert et a. 1989).

International Organisations on Radiation effects. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation). DNA damage is the primary cause of cell death induced by radiation. UNSCEAR (United Nations. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation). Collect and analyze data from the recent literature regarding biological effects of ionizing radiation.

This book provides the reader with information on the clinical effects of.

This book provides the reader with information on the clinical effects of solar radiation, such as inflammation, pigmentation, immune-suppression, cancer and aging, with emphasis on the ethnic or genetic background.

Interest in the biological effects of ionising radiation closely followed the identification of such radiation. The realisation that DNA is the site of genetic infonnation in cells subsequently focussed attention on DNA as an important target in the lethal and mutagenic effects of ionising radiation. Thus radiation effects upon DNA became an important area for fundamental scientific studies by radiation biologists, chemists and physicists. To a first approximation, the concerns of the three disciplines can be divided by time scales: the physical process of energy deposition from photon or charged 16 12 particle and subsequent relaxation (-10- to 10- secs), followed by chemical 12 2 reactions (- 10- to 10 secs), and fmally, the expression of biological effect (minutes to years). Thus, the concept of 'early processes' conveys different ideas to different scientists, although they are all interrelated. To attempt to describe in any detail all these processes is a mammoth task which is not made easier by the different conventions and experimental approaches of the three disciplines. However, the recent advances in all these scientific areas seemed, to the organisers at least, to offer the opportunity to stimulate more active interaction between physicists, chemists and biologists. With this in mind, a multi-disciplinary workshop was organised, which brought together some fifty scientists to present their own specialist interests and, through extensive discussion, explore which problems are of high priority and require input from the different disciplines to resolve them.