» » Lyme Disease: The Cause, the Cure, the Controversy (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book)
Download Lyme Disease: The Cause, the Cure, the Controversy (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) djvu

Download Lyme Disease: The Cause, the Cure, the Controversy (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) djvu

by Dr. Alan G. Barbour MD

Author: Dr. Alan G. Barbour MD
Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences
Language: English
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (March 26, 1996)
Pages: 280 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: azw docx lrf mobi

Series: A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. Paperback: 280 pages.

Series: A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. With that being said we nary get a glimpse of that genius or insights about Borreliosis from his book. He seems to purposely skim over topics such as persistence, intracellular invasion, vaccine issues with certain bacterial proteins and human tissue types.

Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Published April 1st 1996 by Johns Hopkins University Press (first published March 26th 1996). Lyme Disease: The Cause, the Cure, the Controversy. 0801852455 (ISBN13: 9780801852459).

Lyme disease is one of the least understood of the new diseases-and one of the most dreaded. Because undiagnosed or untreated Lyme disease can pose serious health threats, people who develop symptoms such as joint pain and tiredness worry that they may have chronic Lyme disease.

The list of diseases humankind has managed to defeat is impressive – polio, typhoid, measles, tetanus, yellow fever, smallpox, diphtheria and chicken pox have been almost completely eliminated in many parts of the world. Vaccines and powerful drugs have allowed our species to fight back against the bacteria, parasites and viruses that threaten to kill us.

Lyme disease is named after a community on the coast of Connecticut. The first cases in the . Because the disease can be cured with antibiotics or simply avoided by limiting exposure to ticks, Barbour thinks that the public may demand a vaccine that ha. . Scientists, however, believe that B. burgdorferi has been around for thousands of years. Because the disease can be cured with antibiotics or simply avoided by limiting exposure to ticks, Barbour thinks that the public may demand a vaccine that has absolutely no side effects.

This is cause by the Yown ticks. STAY AWAY FROM THE YOWN AND SHAYONIA!!! Lyme disease, also known as Lyme borreliosis, is an infectious disease caused by the Borrelia bacterium which is spread by ticks. The most common sign of infection is an expanding area of redness on the skin, known as erythema migrans, that appears at the site of the tick bite about a week after it occurred. The rash is typically neither itchy nor painful. Approximately 70–80% of infected people develop a rash.

Throughout the book, Dr. Barbour uses the stories of four "patients" to illustrate the varying course of the disease in different individuals and under different circumstances

series A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. An expert on tick-borne diseases, Alan G. Barbour explains the course of illness that results from infection, diagnosis and treatment options, and steps that can be taken to avoid a tick bite in the first place.

series A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease may also transmit other disease-causing pathogens, and these other infections are considered as well.

Request PDF On Aug 26, 2015, Sandra Pearson and others published Lyme Disease Barbour Alan Lyme . Human and animal health also are threatened by Lyme disease, which is spread by the deer tick (Ixodes dammini).

Human and animal health also are threatened by Lyme disease, which is spread by the deer tick (Ixodes dammini). Although sterilants to reduce and/or slow the growth of deer populations and vaccines against Lyme disease may soon. Oral baits represent one promising possibility.

Lyme disease is one of the least understood of the new diseases--and one of the most dreaded. Because undiagnosed or untreated Lyme disease can pose serious health threats, people who develop symptoms such as joint pain and tiredness worry that they may have chronic Lyme disease. Even people with confirmed acute Lyme disease worry that the treatment they're getting won't cure the disease and that it may reappear later in a more debilitating form. These fears are made worse by the well-publicized uncertainties surrounding diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

In this book, noted Lyme disease researcher and clinician Alan Barbour presents a comprehensive and even-handed discussion of what we know about the disease and offers medical science's current thinking about its more controversial aspects. Throughout the book, Dr. Barbour uses the stories of four "patients" to illustrate the varying course of the disease in different individuals and under different circumstances. A fifth "patient" stands as the model for people who, in the absence of a clear diagnosis, remain convinced that Lyme disease explains their symptoms--and as a result suffer for too long without appropriate treatment for what's really ailing them.

Including illustrations of ticks and the rashes caused by their bites, as well as maps showing the worldwide distribution of Lyme disease and the relative risk of the disease across the United States, the book offers a wealth of useful information for patients, family members and caregivers, and those who live, work, and play in high-risk areas:

Explains how Lyme disease is spread, and who is at risk Describes the symptoms and consequences of Lyme disease, from the rash following a tick bite to the most serious complications, such as infection of the nervous system, joints, and heart Describes all the diagnostic tests for Lyme disease and explains what the test results mean Compares Lyme disease with other conditions, such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, and explains why they are often mistaken for Lyme disease Presents a compassionate and convincing discussion of depression, which is often the correct diagnosis for a patient who clings to a diagnosis of Lyme disease despite repeated negative diagnostic tests Carefully explains proven and unproven treatments, and summarizes the debates about antibiotic and other treatments Outlines what individuals can do to avoid getting Lyme disease as well as what the community can do to reduce the number of Lyme-carrying ticks

Here at last is an intelligent and interesting guide for patients, as well as an insider's tour of medical science. The author includes an explanation of how the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium was discovered in the laboratory and how it was first connected with the disease, a fascinating account of modern medical detective work.