» » Military Force as an Instrument of U.S. Foreign Policy: Intervention in Lebanon, August 1982-February 1984
Download Military Force as an Instrument of U.S. Foreign Policy: Intervention in Lebanon, August 1982-February 1984 djvu

Download Military Force as an Instrument of U.S. Foreign Policy: Intervention in Lebanon, August 1982-February 1984 djvu

by Ralph A Hallenbeck

Author: Ralph A Hallenbeck
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Praeger (March 30, 1991)
Pages: 248 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt doc mbr mobi

At various junctures in the analysis, Hallenbeck compares his findings to those of other authors writing about the Vietnam War, an intervention that he feels strongly parallels the American experience in Lebanon. He also refers to the relevant body of politico-military and decision-making theory.

Home Browse Books Book details, Military Force as an Instrument of . Military Force as an Instrument of . Foreign Policy: Intervention in Lebanon, August 1982-February 1984. By Ralph A. Hallenbeck.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. foreign policy : intervention in Lebanon, August 1982-February 1984 Ralph A. Book's title: Military force as an instrument of .

Hallenbeck, Ralph . Foreign Policy: Intervention in Lebanon, August 1982 - February 1984. New York: Praeger, 1991, 232 . oogle Scholar. Katholische Akademie Hamburg (Hrsg. : Die Christen im Libanon. Hamburg: Katholische Akademie Hamburg, 1990, 176 . Korbani, Agnes . . Intervention in Lebanon, 1958 and 1982: Presidential Decisionmaking. New York: Praeger, 1991, 142 . Cite this chapter as: Deutsches Orient-Institut, Koszinowski . Mattes H. (1991) Libanon. In: Deutsches Orient-Institut, Koszinowski . (eds) Nahost Jahrbuch 1991.

Lebanon History Israeli intervention, 1982-1985. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Geographic Name: United States Foreign relations 1981-1989. Geographic Name: United States Military policy. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

The story begins with the landing of the 32d Marine Amphibious Unit (32d MAU) in Beirut in August 1982 at the request of the Lebanese Government to assist, together with French and Italian military units, in supervising the evacuation of the Palestine Liberation Organization.

The use of military force has been a difficult subject for American leaders for three decades. Ever since the failure of American policy and military power in Vietnam, it has been hard for . policy makers to gain domestic support for the use of force as an instrument of statecraft. military power has been exercised throughout this 30-year period, but both threats of its use and the actual conduct of military operations have usually been controversial, turned to reluctantly, and marked by significant failures as well as successes

Making war against nation states and their people no longer works

Making war against nation states and their people no longer works. Unstable and undemocratic countries are usually controlled by individuals and cabals against whom military force ends up harming their own domestic victims more than the entrenched leadership, and new regimes offer little improvement. Destroying the infrastructure of a nation to turn its people against their leadership fails, as in Iraq, resulting in the deaths of thousands of innocent children. Targeting insurgents using drones and violent nighttime home invasions fails, as in Afghanistan, resulting in collateral deaths.

com Product Description (ISBN 0275937100, Hardcover). His study goes a long way toward explicating those factors that contributed most to this foreign policy failure. America's role in Lebanon is examined in four chapters, with each chapter recounting the events that occurred during the successive phases of the intervention.

Although over six years have passed since the Lebanon intervention ended, American leaders appear to be no closer to an appreciation of what went wrong than they were in 1984. Ralph Hallenbeck's authoritative account of the American intervention in Lebanon fills this significant void. His study goes a long way toward explicating those factors that contributed most to this foreign policy failure.

America's role in Lebanon is examined in four chapters, with each chapter recounting the events that occurred during the successive phases of the intervention. At various junctures in the analysis, Hallenbeck compares his findings to those of other authors writing about the Vietnam War, an intervention that he feels strongly parallels the American experience in Lebanon. He also refers to the relevant body of politico-military and decision-making theory. The author's ultimate purpose in using this comparative approach is to suggest that conclusions derived from the study of the Lebanon intervention may be relevant both to an understanding of the past and to future attempts to achieve limited ends through the measured application of military force. Hallenbeck's case study is useful as both source material for students and scholars concerned with examining national security policy-making and as a critical discussion of recent events.