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by Daniel Horowitz

Author: Daniel Horowitz
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's; 1st edition (August 24, 2004)
Pages: 203 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr lit txt lrf

DANIEL HOROWITZ is professor of American studies and history at Smith College

DANIEL HOROWITZ is professor of American studies and history at Smith College. His scholarly work focuses on the cultural, social, and intellectual history of the United States. He is the author of Betty Friedan and the Making of the Feminine Mystique (1998), Vance Packard and American Social Criticism (1994), and The Morality of Spending: Attitudes toward the Consumer Society in America, 1875-1940, which was selected by Choice Magazine as one of the outstanding academic books of 1984.

Energy and the National Goals - A Crisis of Confidence. delivered 15 July, 1979. But over those years the subjects of the speeches, the talks, and the press conferences have become increasingly narrow, focused more and more on what the isolated world of Washington thinks is important. Gradually, you’ve heard more and more about what the government thinks or what the government should be doing and less and less about our nation’s hopes, our dreams, and our vision of the future.

In his "Crisis of Confidence" speech, one of the most remarkable political . Through carefully selected documents that bring together the high-level White House decision-making process and the national conversation about energy, Daniel Horowitz helps students understand both the crises of the 1970s and the continuing relationship between American economic and foreign policy. Jimmy Carter and the Energy Crisis of the 1970s: The "Crisis of Confidence" Speech of July 15, 1979 (The Bedford Series in History and Culture). 0312401221 (ISBN13: 9780312401221).

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July 15. Jimmy Carter speaks about a national crisis in confidence. On this day in 1979, President Jimmy Carter addresses the nation via live television to discuss the nation’s energy crisis and accompanying recession. Carter prefaced his talk about energy policy with an explanation of why he believed the American economy remained in crisis. Although the energy crisis and recession were the main topics of conversation, Carter heard from the attendees that Americans were also suffering from a deeper moral and spiritual crisis. This lack of moral and spiritual confidence, he concluded, was at the core of America’s inability to hoist itself out of its economic troubles.

On this day in 1979, with energy prices soaring and interest rates spiking, President Jimmy Carter told an anxious nation . However, in the wake of the speech, after Carter demanded the resignations of several Cabinet members, the public mood dimmed

On this day in 1979, with energy prices soaring and interest rates spiking, President Jimmy Carter told an anxious nation in a prime-time televised address that it faced a crisis of confidence. However, in the wake of the speech, after Carter demanded the resignations of several Cabinet members, the public mood dimmed. An ensuing widespread sense of a White House cast adrift helped set the stage for Carter’s defeat in 1980 by Republican Ronald Reagan. In summing up the Carter presidency, historian Michael Beschloss wrote that it never fulfilled its high initial expectations.

In a decade of constant crises, perhaps the most formidable challenge that .

In a decade of constant crises, perhaps the most formidable challenge that Americans faced in the 1970s was the energy shortage. An era of inexpensive and seemingly unlimited supplies of oil came to an end with the OPEC oil embargo of 1973 and strained the nation7;s economy for the remainder of the decade. In his 0;Crisis of Confidence1; speech, one of the most remarkable political addresses in American history, President Jimmy Carter drew connections between America7;s increasing dependence on foreign oil and what he considered larger, more spiritual problems that plagued the nation.

On July 15, 1979, amid stagnant economic growth, high inflation, and an energy crisis, Jimmy Carter delivered a televised address to the American people

On July 15, 1979, amid stagnant economic growth, high inflation, and an energy crisis, Jimmy Carter delivered a televised address to the American people. In it, Carter singled out a pervasive crisis of confidence preventing the American people from moving the country forward. A year later, Ronald Reagan would frame his optimistic political campaign in stark contrast to the tone of Carter’s speech, which would be remembered, especially by critics, as the malaise speech. The symptoms of this crisis of the American spirit are all around us. For the first time in the history of our country a majority of our people believe that the next five years will be worse than the past five years.

In a decade of constant crises, perhaps the most formidable challenge that Americans faced in the 1970s was the energy shortage. An era of inexpensive and seemingly unlimited supplies of oil came to an end with the OPEC oil embargo of 1973 and strained the nation's economy for the remainder of the decade. In his "Crisis of Confidence" speech, one of the most remarkable political addresses in American history, President Jimmy Carter drew connections between America's increasing dependence on foreign oil and what he considered larger, more spiritual problems that plagued the nation. Through carefully selected documents that bring together the high-level White House decision-making process and the national conversation about energy, Daniel Horowitz helps students understand both the crises of the 1970s and the continuing relationship between American economic and foreign policy. An introduction by the editor, headnotes to documents, a chronology, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography provide further pedagogical support.