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Download The Theory of Moral Sentiments djvu

Download The Theory of Moral Sentiments djvu

by Adam Smith

Author: Adam Smith
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Gutenberg Publishers (March 26, 2011)
Pages: 358 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx lrf lit doc

The Theory of Moral Sentiments.

The Theory of Moral Sentiments. 13 We sympathize even with the dead, and overlooking what is of real importance in their situation, that awful futurity which awaits them, we are chiey aected by those circumstances which strike our senses, but can have no inuence upon their happiness.

The Theory of Moral Sentiments is a 1759 book by Adam Smith. It provided the ethical, philosophical, psychological, and methodological underpinnings to Smith's later works, including The Wealth of Nations (1776), Essays on Philosophical Subjects (1795), and Lectures on Justice, Police, Revenue, and Arms (1763) (first published in 1896)

The Kessinger "book" is a bad reprint of a couple of chapters of Smith's entire "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" and runs less than their stated 60 pages

The Kessinger "book" is a bad reprint of a couple of chapters of Smith's entire "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" and runs less than their stated 60 pages. For half the price, you can get a brand new complete printed copy (running several hundred pages) or get the whole thing on Kindle for 99 cents.

Chapter 3: The corruption of our moral sentiments that comes from this disposition to admire the rich and the great, and to despise or neglect the .

Chapter 3: The corruption of our moral sentiments that comes from this disposition to admire the rich and the great, and to despise or neglect the downtrodden and poor. Part II: Merit and demerit: the objects of reward and punishment. Section 1: The sense of merit and demerit.

Smith ends The Theory Of Moral Sentiments by defining the character of a truly virtuous person. Prudence moderates the individual’s excesses and as such is important for society.

In his first book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, he investigated the flip side of economic self-interest: the . In 1751 Smith was appointed Professor of Logic at Glasgow, but was translated to chair of Moral Philosophy in 1752.

In his first book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, he investigated the flip side of economic self-interest: the interest of the greater good. Smith's classic work advances ideas about conscience, moral judgement and virtue that have taken on renewed importance in business and politics. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. The Theory of Moral Sentiments was published in 1759, and The Wealth of Nations in 1776, the same year as the Declaration of Independence.

Adam Smith is rightly known for The Wealth of Nations, the first modern economics book. But he was primarily a moral philosopher, and I believe he himself saw The Theory of Moral Sentiments as his most important book. One might call him the grandfather of modern economics. In it he examines the moral and emotional bases for personal interactions among people. If you read only a few pages, you will be rewarded with aphorisms you can drop into conversations to make you sound very wise, maybe as wise as Adam Smith can make you.

His first book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), a treatise on the formation of moral judgments by men who acted primarily in their own self-interest, became an immediate success

His first book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), a treatise on the formation of moral judgments by men who acted primarily in their own self-interest, became an immediate success. Five years after it was published, he left Glasgow to take a well-paid position as tutor to a young English duke who was about to take the customary grand tour of Europe. While on tour, Smith began work on a manuscript on political economy. This work appeared some years later as The Wealth of Nations. A tour de force, the book argued that the wealth of a country was the sum of the goods produced and consumed by its people, not the monetary wealth, gold, and treasures owned by the nobility.

Adam Smith’s book on the nature of morality was a major work of enlightenment reasoning, and an example of the intellectual ‘mapping’ of the world which occupied the minds of eighteenth-century philosophers, lexicographers and encyclopaedists. Smith sets out to show that our morality and how it governs our actions is a product of the social nature of human society. It proposes that the way humans relate socially is a better guide than reason to understanding how morals develop; from this it considers how justice and prudence are social values, as are altruism and charity.

2011 Reprint of 1790 London Edition. Today Adam Smith's reputation rests on his explanation of how rational self-interest in a free-market economy leads to economic well-being. It may surprise those who would discount Smith as an advocate of ruthless individualism that his first major work concentrates on ethics and charity. In fact, while chair at the University of Glasgow, Smith's lecture subjects, in order of preference, were natural theology, ethics, jurisprudence, and economics, according to John Millar, Smith's pupil at the time. In The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith wrote: "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature which interest him in the fortune of others and render their happiness necessary to him though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it." The Theory of Moral Sentiments establishes the intellectual framework for all of Smith's later work, including the monumental Wealth of Nations.