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by Terence Walz

Author: Terence Walz
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: The American University in Cairo Press; 1 edition (February 15, 2011)
Pages: 256 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lit doc lrf azw

TERENCE WALZ is an independent scholar working in Washington, DC. He is the author of Trade Between Egypt and Bilad as-Sudan, 1700–1820. KENNETH M. CUNO is associate professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

TERENCE WALZ is an independent scholar working in Washington, DC. Publisher: The American University in Cairo Press (November 1, 2010). Publication Date: November 1, 2010

In the nineteenth century hundreds of thousands of Africans were forcibly migrated northward to Egypt and other . 12. Children in the African quarter of Chania with the Italian Barracks in the background (early 20th century). 13. Salis Chelidonakis (1884–1967) (date uncertain).

12. 14. Femme turque avec son esclave (postcard late 19th–early 20th century).

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In the nineteenth century hundreds of thousands of Africans were forcibly migrated northward to Egypt and other . 2 Sudanese, Habasha, Takarna, and Barabira: Trans-Saharan Africans in Cairo as Shown in the 1848 Census.

2 Sudanese, Habasha, Takarna, and Barabira: Trans-Saharan Africans in Cairo as Shown in the 1848 Census. The unpublished 1848 census, the first nationwide household census taken in Egypt in modern times, is a major source of data on the social transformation of Egypt in the nineteenth century.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2012, Paul E. Lovejoy and others published Race and Slavery in the Middle East .

Article in Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 75(1):175-177 · January 2012 with 16 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. February 2012 · Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Paul Ellsworth Lovejoy.

American University in Cairo Press, 2010. Lewis & Clark Chronicle.

Two chapters by Terence Walz and Kenneth Cuno address the significant presence of trans-Saharan Africans in. .

Two chapters by Terence Walz and Kenneth Cuno address the significant presence of trans-Saharan Africans in urban and rural Egypt. Walz examines the Cairo census of 1848 and identifies some 15,000 trans-Saharan Africans, more than half of whom were generically labeled in the census as Sudaniyyin (blacks), while others are identified as: Habasha (Ethiopian), Barabira (from south of Aswan along the Nile), and Takarna (from West Africa and Darfur).

In the nineteenth century hundreds of thousands of Africans were forcibly migrated northward to Egypt and other eastern Mediterranean destinations, yet relatively little is known about them. Studies have focused mainly on the mamluk and harem slaves of elite households, who were mostly white, and on abolitionist efforts to end the slave trade, and most have relied heavily on western language sources. In the past forty years new sources have become available, ranging from Egyptian religious and civil court and police records to rediscovered archives and accounts in western archives and libraries. Along with new developments in the study of African slavery these sources provide a perspective on the lives of non-elite trans-Saharan Africans in nineteenth century Egypt and beyond. The nine essays in this volume examine the lives of slaves and freed men and women in Egypt and the region.Contributors: Kenneth M. Cuno, Y. Hakan Erdem, Michael Ferguson, Emad Ahmad Helal Shams al-Din, Liat Kozma, George Michael La Rue, Ahmad A. Sikainga, Eve M. Troutt Powell, and Terence Walz.