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by Hans Kundnani

Author: Hans Kundnani
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Columbia University Press (December 8, 2009)
Pages: 320 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr lrf doc docx

formulates a clear hypothesis and, based on two main currents and its ramifications, traces the 1968 generation's ambivalent handling of the role of their parents' generation . Hans Kundnani is a journalist based in London.

formulates a clear hypothesis and, based on two main currents and its ramifications, traces the 1968 generation's ambivalent handling of the role of their parents' generation in Nazi Germany up to the present. Susanne Bressan Shofar 1900-01-00). He studied philosophy and German at Oxford University and journalism at Columbia University. He is a former correspondent for the Observer and writes for various newspapers and magazines, including the Guardian, Wall Street Journal, Prospect, and the Times Literary Supplement.

Utopia or Auschwitz book. Published November 1st 2009 by Columbia University Press (first published 2009). Sep 26, 2018 Luke rated it really liked it. Shelves: history, geo-europe, temp-modern-late, comprehensive-exams.

The transition of the 1968 generation from radicalism to realpolitik is a fascinating, complex story and Kundnani tells it. .Utopia or Auschwitz is an enlightening read for anyone interested not just in left-wing extremism, but in European politics more generally.

The transition of the 1968 generation from radicalism to realpolitik is a fascinating, complex story and Kundnani tells it with aplomb. Combining narrative and analysis, he shows how the original spirit of 1968 already contained contradictions. The students could be as authoritarian as the state they purported to reject. Kundnani, a former Observer correspondent in Berlin, combines a broad historical sweep with a journalist's eye for a human story.

Pitch Us Your New Book! . Young people, and especially university students in the BRD, were keenly aware of this fact, and they wondered how it could be that the so-called Auschwitz generation could have changed their tune so quickly.

Pitch Us Your New Book! Partner with the NBn. About the NBn. Become an NBn Host. Under the influence of some rather clever left-leaning philosophers (those of the Frankfurt School), some of them came to the conclusion that they hadn’t and that, therefore, Germany was still a fascist state. This conclusion (erroneous as it was) gave them striking moral clarity: there was only one thing to do when faced with fascism–resist it by any means necessary.

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Germany's 1968 generation came to political maturity in the "red-green" coalition of 1998. Kundnani, who brilliantly untangles the threads, calls the idea that Nazi Germany had never ended and the Federal Republic was a fascist state the "continuity thesis". Gerhard Schröder was chancellor, Joschka Fischer his foreign minister, and Otto Schily occupied the interior ministry. The Achtundsechsziger, the 68ers, had entered politics calling for resistance. The rorist Ulrike Meinhof devoted her journalism to uncovering Nazis in high office and disclosing the "Hitler in all of us.

Request PDF On Dec 1, 2012, Bill Niven and others published Utopia or Auschwitz: Germany's . August 2011 · Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

August 2011 · Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

Автор: Kundnani Hans Название: Utopia or Auschwitz: Germany& 1968 Generation and .

This book traces the political journey of Germany& post-war generation and examines the influence that its ambivalent attitude to the Nazi past had on the foreign policy of the & government between 1998 and 2005.

Kundnani, Hans (2009). Utopia Or Auschwitz: Germany's 1968 Generation and the Holocaust. a b c d Hauser, Dorothea (2008). In Martin Klimke, Joachim Scharloth (e. Columbia University Press. p. 114. ^ Kundnani 91, 99. ^ a b c d Hauser, Dorothea (2008). 1968 in Europe: a history of protest and activism, 1956-1977. a b c d Gessler, Philipp; Stefan Reinecke (25 October 2005).

Utopia or Auschwitz : Germany's 1968 Generation and the Holocaust. He studied German and philosophy at Oxford and journalism at Columbia University

Utopia or Auschwitz : Germany's 1968 Generation and the Holocaust. Kundnani - combines a broad historical sweep with a journalist's eye for a human story. He studied German and philosophy at Oxford and journalism at Columbia University. He was a correspondent in Germany for the Observer and has also written for the Guardian, Wall Street Journal, Prospect and the Times Literary Supplement and various newspapers in Germany.

One thing separated the left-wing students who demonstrated on the streets of West Berlin and Frankfurt in 1968 from their counterparts elsewhere around the world. The young Germans who became known as the 1968 generation or the Achtundsechziger had grown up knowing that their parents were responsible for Nazism and in particular for the Holocaust. Germany's 1968 generation did not merely dream of a better world as some of their revolutionary contemporaries in other countries did; they felt compelled to act to save Germany from itself. It was an all-or-nothing choice: Utopia or Auschwitz.

However, although many in the West German student movement imagined their struggle against capitalism as a kind of ex post facto resistance against Nazism, they also had a tendency to relativise the Holocaust. Others, meanwhile, wanted to draw a line under the Nazi past. In fact, despite the anti-fascist rhetoric of the Achtundsechziger, there were also nationalist and anti-Semitic currents in the West German New Left that grew out of the student movement. In short, the 1968 generation had a deeply ambivalent relationship with the Nazi past.

Utopia or Auschwitz explores these contradictory currents as it traces the political journey of Germany's 1968 generation, via the left-wing terrorism of the seventies and the Social Democrats and Greens in the eighties, to political power in the nineties in the form of the first-ever "red-green" government in Germany. It examines the "red-green" government's foreign policy, in particular its response to the Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq crises, which reflected the 1968 generation's ambivalent relationship with the Nazi past.