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Download The Laboratory of the Mind: Thought Experiments in the Natural Sciences djvu

Download The Laboratory of the Mind: Thought Experiments in the Natural Sciences djvu

by James Robert Brown

Author: James Robert Brown
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 2 edition (July 29, 2010)
Pages: 240 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.4
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James Robert Brown is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto .

James Robert Brown is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. the source of the correlation has been the same as the source of the thought experimenter's knowledge of the remote measurement results - namely, a law of nature. There is a remarkable harmony here: the structure of knowing and the structure of reality mirror one another.

Thought experiments are performed in the laboratory of the mind. Beyond this metaphor it is difficult to say just what these remarkable devices for investigating nature are or how they work

Thought experiments are performed in the laboratory of the mind. Beyond this metaphor it is difficult to say just what these remarkable devices for investigating nature are or how they work. Though most scientists and philosophers would admit their great importance, there has been very little serious study of them. This volume is the first book-length investigation of thought experiments. Starting with Galileo's argument on falling bodies, Brown describes numerous examples of the most influential thought experiments from the history of science.

Newton's bucket, Einstein's elevator, Schrödinger's cat – these are some of the best-known examples of thought experiments in the natural sciences

Newton's bucket, Einstein's elevator, Schrödinger's cat – these are some of the best-known examples of thought experiments in the natural sciences.

James Robert Brown FRSC (born 1949 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian philosopher of science. He is a Professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto. In the philosophy of mathematics, he has advocated mathematical Platonism, and in the philosophy of science he has defended scientific realism mostly against anti-realist views associated with social constructivism. He is largely known for his pioneering writing about thought experiments in science and in general.

First, Brown does not consider thought experiments from all of the natural sciences, but instead focuses merely on physics . This history is fascinating, and is chock full of thought experiments not mentioned before in the book.

First, Brown does not consider thought experiments from all of the natural sciences, but instead focuses merely on physics (and, to a lesser degree, mathematics, which again is no natural science). Second, the goal of the book is not just to provide an overview or typology of thought experiments, but to argue for a Platonist interpretation of physics. In contrast, Chapter 7 attempts a reconstruction of Einstein's philosophy of science.

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Nonetheless, their reliability to produce cognitive results has been a disputable matter. This study is conducted to present some rules of confirmation for evaluating the cognitive outcome of thought experiments. The puzzle of thought experiments is a hot topic in the philosophy of science. The paper raises the puzzle with respect to pragmatics as follows: How is it possible that thought experiments in pragmatics yield new experiential information about communication, although they are carried out entirely in one's head?

Newton's bucket, Einstein's elevator, Schrödinger's cat – these are some of the best-known examples of thought experiments in the natural sciences. But what function do these experiments perform? Are they really experiments at all? Can they help us gain a greater understanding of the natural world? How is it possible that we can learn new things just by thinking?

In this revised and updated new edition of his classic text The Laboratory of the Mind, James Robert Brown continues to defend apriorism in the physical world. This edition features two new chapters, one on “counter thought experiments” and another on the development of inertial motion. With plenty of illustrations and updated coverage of the debate between Platonic rationalism and classic empiricism, this is a lively and engaging contribution to the field of philosophy of science.