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by Louis P. Masur

Author: Louis P. Masur
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Hill and Wang; First edition (February 9, 2002)
Pages: 272 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr doc lrf azw

Louis Masur has set himself up in a propitious perch astride the end of republican America and the ascendance of that messier thing called democracy.

Ships from and sold by BOOK- LAND. Louis Masur has set himself up in a propitious perch astride the end of republican America and the ascendance of that messier thing called democracy.

1831 was one of them, and in this striking new work, Louis Masur shows us exactly ho. he year began with a solar eclipse, for . he year began with a solar eclipse, for many an omen of mighty changes - and for once, such predictions held true. Nat Turner's rebellion soon followed, then ever-more violent congressional arguments over slavery and tarrifs. As Masur's analysis makes clear, by 1831 it was becoming all too certain that political rancor, the struggle over slavery, the pursuit of individualism, and technological development might eclipse the glorious potential of the early republic-and lead the nation to secession and civil war.

Beginning this work with the Solar Eclipse of 1831, Masur highlights the events that took place over the course of 1831, a year that, as he goes on describe, changed the course of Antebellum America. The points that Masur decides to highlight - whether Nat Turner's Rebellion, the burning religious revivals of NY and Greater New England, the Indian Removal Acts, the Jacksonian presidency as a whole, and the increase in man-made machinery - give breadth to the notion that 1831 changed the course Beginning this work with the Solar Eclipse of 1831, Masur highlights the events that.

Louis Masur's "1831: Year of Eclipse" is an excellent example of a scholarly, yet narrative, history

Louis Masur's "1831: Year of Eclipse" is an excellent example of a scholarly, yet narrative, history. Masur uses the eclipse as a metaphor for Antebellum America-strained under the opposing forces of light and dark, slavery and freedom, nature and machines, religion and politics.

In this new book, Louis P. Masur shows why Americans saw the eclipse as a portent of their future. The year 1831 was, for the United States, a crucial time when the nation was no longer a young, uncomplicated republic but, rather, a dynamic and conflicted country inching toward a cataclysm. By the year's end, nearly every aspect of its political, social, and cultural life had undergone profound change.

At the same time, Garrison's "Liberator" began to become a thorn in the side of slavers who considered such tracts as direct interference in their business.

1831: Year of Eclipse. 1831 - Louis P. Masur.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. 1831: Year of Eclipse. Everyone knew it was coming. THE GREAT ECLIPSE OF 1831 will be one of the most remarkable that will again be witnessed in the United States for a long course of years, alerted Ash’s Pocket Almanac.

Louis Masur has captured the flavor of this crucial year in this captivating book.

As Masur's analysis makes clear, by 1831 it was becoming all too certain that political rancor, the struggle over slavery, the pursuit of individualism, and technological development might eclipse the glorious potential of the early republic-and lead the nation to secession and civil war. This is an innovative and challenging interpretation of a key moment in antibellum America. Connect with the author. Louis Masur has captured the flavor of this crucial year in this captivating book.

Also by louis p. On the day of the eclipse, from New England through the South, Americans looked to the heavens.

1776, 1861, 1929. Any high-school student should know what these years meant to American history. But wars and economic disasters are not our only pivotal events, and other years have, in a quieter way, swayed the course of our nation. 1831 was one of them, and in this striking new work, Louis Masur shows us exactly how.

The year began with a solar eclipse, for many an omen of mighty changes -- and for once, such predictions held true. Nat Turner's rebellion soon followed, then ever-more violent congressional arguments over slavery and tarrifs. Religious revivalism swept the North, and important observers (including Tocqueville) traveled the land, forming the opinions that would shape the world's view of America for generations to come. New technologies, meanwhile, were dramatically changing Americans' relationship with the land, and Andrew Jackson's harsh policies toward the Cherokee erased most Indians' last hopes of autonomy. As Masur's analysis makes clear, by 1831 it was becoming all too certain that political rancor, the struggle over slavery, the pursuit of individualism, and technological development might eclipse the glorious potential of the early republic--and lead the nation to secession and civil war. This is an innovative and challenging interpretation of a key moment in antibellum America.