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by David Moon

Author: David Moon
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (January 4, 2002)
Pages: 232 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx lrf doc mobi

Start by marking The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia: 1762-1907 as Want to Read . Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia presents the reform as a process.

Start by marking The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia: 1762-1907 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It traces the origins of the abolition of serfdom back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907.

Serfdom in the Urals and Siberia generally occurred rarely until, during the reign (1762-1796) of Catherine the Great, businesses began to send serfs into those areas in an. .The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia". Harlow: Pearson Education Limited, 2001.

Serfdom in the Urals and Siberia generally occurred rarely until, during the reign (1762-1796) of Catherine the Great, businesses began to send serfs into those areas in an attempt to harvest their extensive untapped natural resources. Emperor Alexander I (r. 1801–1825) wanted to reform the system but moved only cautiously.

The institution of serfdom a true form of slavery in Russia, had been demolished. The declaration introduced new structures in justice and education while the migration of peasantry increased. The Manifesto was the leading step towards freedom and social progress in Russia.

David Moon Is Reader in Modern History at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. Country of Publication.

item 2 The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia: 1762-1907 (Seminar Studies In History), Moon -The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia: 1762-1907 (Seminar Studies In History), Moon. item 3 The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia, 1762-1907 by David Moon -The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia, 1762-1907 by David Moon. item 4 Abolition of Serfdom in Russia - 9780582294868 -Abolition of Serfdom in Russia - 9780582294868. David Moon Is Reader in Modern History at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.

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Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in.In February 1861 Tsar Alexander II issued the statutes abolishing the institution of serfdom in Russia.

Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia presents the reform as a process. The procedures set in motion by Alexander II undid the ties that bound together 22 million serfs and 100,000 noble estate owners, and changed the face of Russia.

seriesSeminar Studies.

David Moon is Reader in Modern History at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow

David Moon is Reader in Modern History at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. The story of abolition in Russia is not what you might think-many czars and czarinas thought that serfdom should be ended, but couldn't figure out how to do it. The abolition in 1861 was terribly clumsy and costly, and actually increased discontent among the masses, leading to the rise of Bolshevism.

Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia presents the reform as a process

Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia presents the reform as a process.

In February 1861 Tsar Alexander II issued thestatutes abolishing the institution ofserfdom in Russia. The procedures set in motion by Alexander II undid the ties that bound together 22 million serfs and 100,000 noble estate owners, and changed the face of Russia. Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russiapresents the reform as a process.It tracesthe origins of the abolition of serfdom back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, the book shows how the reform process linked the old social, economic and political order of eighteenth-century Russia with the radical transformations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that culminated in revolution in 1917.