» » Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement
Download Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement djvu

Download Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement djvu

by Lise McKean

Author: Lise McKean
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 15, 1996)
Pages: 380 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc lrf rtf docx

Focusing on the organizations and activities of Hindu ascetics and gurus . In this close look at the business of religion, McKean traces the ideological and organizational antecedents to the Hindu nationalist movement.

In this close look at the business of religion, McKean traces the ideological and organizational antecedents to the Hindu nationalist movement. The Indian state's increasing patronage of Hindu institutions makes competition for its support greater than ever.

Divine Life Society Divine enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement, by Lise McKean. Swami Sivananda and the Divine Life Society: An Illustration of Revitalization Movement, by Satish Chandra Gyan. Published by ., 1979. Swami Sivananda's books. University of Chicago Press, 1996.

and organizational antecedents to the Hindu nationalist movement. With a remarkable selection of photographs and advertisements showing icons of spirituality used to sell commodities from textiles to cement to comic books, McKean illustrates the pervasive presence of Hindu imagery in India's burgeoning market economy.

Divine Enterprise book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Hindu Nationalist Movement and Indian Politics: 1925 to the 1990s. New Delhi: Pengu in Books. Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Women in Ochre Robes: Gendering Hindu Renunciation. Menon, Kalyani D. 2005. We Will Become Jijabai: Historical Tales of Hindu Nationalist Women in India. Journal of Asian Studies 64 (1): 103–126. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Menon, Ritu, and Kamla Bhasin.

Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement. Through shrewd marketing and publicity, Hindu spiritual leaders can play powerful roles in contemporary India as businessmen and government officials

Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement. Through shrewd marketing and publicity, Hindu spiritual leaders can play powerful roles in contemporary India as businessmen and government officials. Religious Nationalism: Hindus and Muslims in India. The Freedom Movement and the RSS: A Story of Betrayal (Third e. University of Chicago Press. Islam, Shamsul (2000). Joshi-Adhikari Institute of Social Studies. RSS, Jana Sangh & BJP. Bhatt, Chetan (2001). Hindu Nationalism: Origins, Ideologies and Modern Myths. The Free Literature Section freely distributes books and other literature to seekers and aspirants worldwide. Sivananda Charitable Hospital renders free medical service to the public and conducts periodical medical relief camps freely. Sivananda Home Takes care of food, clothing and medical needs of Destitute Patients.

Divine Enterprise: Gurus and the Hindu Nationalist Movement, by Lise McKean, 40: 180-82. With Liberty and Justice for All: The Meaning of the Bill of Rights Today, by Harold V. Knight, 9: 397-98. Kerala Christian Sainthood: Collisions of Culture and Worldview in South India, by Corinne G. Dempsey, 44: 347-48.

University of Chicago Press.

Through shrewd marketing and publicity, Hindu spiritual leaders can play powerful roles in contemporary India as businessmen and government officials. Focusing on the organizations and activities of Hindu ascetics and gurus, Lise McKean explores the complex interrelations among religion, the political economy of India, and global capitalism.In this close look at the business of religion, McKean traces the ideological and organizational antecedents to the Hindu nationalist movement. The Indian state's increasing patronage of Hindu institutions makes competition for its support greater than ever. Using materials from guru's publications, the press, and extensive field research, McKean examines how participation by upper-caste ruling class groups in the Divine Life Society and other Hindu organizations further legitimates their own authority. With a remarkable selection of photographs and advertisements showing icons of spirituality used to sell commodities from textiles to cement to comic books, McKean illustrates the pervasive presence of Hindu imagery in India's burgeoning market economy. She shows how gurus popularize Hindu nationalism through imagery such as the goddess, Mother India, and her martyred sons and daughters.