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Download Unequal Freedom: How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizenship and Labor djvu

Download Unequal Freedom: How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizenship and Labor djvu

by Evelyn Nakano Glenn

Author: Evelyn Nakano Glenn
Subcategory: Humanities
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard University Press; 49331st edition (April 15, 2004)
Pages: 320 pages
Category: Other
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf rtf lit azw

Additionally it has received multiple awards from scholarly associations for its contribution to understanding race and gender inequality in America.

Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of. .seeks to explain the persistence of inequality in US society

Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery. seeks to explain the persistence of inequality in US society. She provides a comparative analysis of the interaction of racial and gender relations in three settings: the South, the Southwest, and Hawaii.

Evelyn Nakano Glenn's Unequal Freedom is an ambitious and important book

Evelyn Nakano Glenn's Unequal Freedom is an ambitious and important book. Drawing on a wealth of recent scholarship, she argues that "in the United States, race and gender have been simultaneously organizing principles and products of citizenship and labor" (p. 236). She examines the two major structures through which unequal race and gender relations "were shaped and contested in the United States" (p. 1): citizenship and labor. Glenn focuses on the years between Reconstruction and 1930, a period of ferment in the meaning of citizenship and labor.

Unequal Freedom book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Unequal Freedom: How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizenship and Labor as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-299) and index.

Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War I. Please tell us how we can improve it.

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How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizenship and Labor

How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizenship and Labor. Evelyn Nakano Glenn succeeds in doing this analysi. lenn’s work meets the difficult challenge of analyzing discourses that are often hidden from dominant modes of thinking and understanding. This contribution makes her work compelling and important to our discipline. Erin McNeal Reser, Rhetoric and Public Affairs. has long professed its commitment to universal equality, it remains a society in which gender and race limit opportunities.

As a historical sociologist and professor of ethnic studies and women's studies at the University of California, Berkeley, Glenn is well-qualified to frame the larger picture for us, and she does so in clear, unpretentious prose.

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The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights.

After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.